Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Extreme events reconnaissance: Social science and interdisciplinary research in the disaster aftermath

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Lori PeekLori Peek is Professor of Sociology and Director of the Natural Hazards Center at the University of Colorado-Boulder. She studies vulnerable populations in disaster and is author of Behind the Backlash: Muslim Americans after 9/11, co-editor of Displaced: Life in the Katrina Diaspora, and co-author of Children of Katrina. Behind the Backlash received the Distinguished Book Award from the Midwest Sociological Society and the Best Book Award from the American Sociological Association Section on Altruism, Morality, and Social Solidarity. Children of Katrina received the Best Book Award from the American Sociological Association Section on Children and Youth and the Alfred and Betty McClung Best Book Award from the Association for Humanist Sociologists, and was named a finalist for the Colorado Book Awards. In 2016, Dr. Peek, received honorable mention for the Leo Goodman Award for Outstanding Contributions to Sociological Methodology from the American Sociological Association Section on Methodology. And in 2009, the American Sociological Association Section on Children and Youth honored Dr. Peek with the Early Career Award for Outstanding Scholarship.

date

Wednesday, February 7, 2018
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2018-02-07
 
More than just mountains: How the geology of the Sierra Nevada shapes modern American life

More than just mountains: How the geology of the Sierra Nevada shapes modern American life

Please join us for a book talk by Craig Jones, co-sponsored by the Center for Environmental Journalism and the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences.

Jones's book The Mountains That Remade America reflects on the Sierra Nevada range and how those mountains have changed the way Americans live, from ski towns to national parks, fresh fruit to environmental lawsuits. Whether and where there was gold to be mined redefined land, mineral, and water laws. Where rain falls (and where it doesn’t) determines whose fruit grows on trees and whose appears on slot machines. The book combines geology with history to show how the particular forces and conditions that created the Sierra Nevada have influenced daily life in the United States, both in the past and into the present day.

The book presentation will be followed by a Q&A session.

date

Thursday, February 8, 2018
5:00pm to 6:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

contact

Laura.Krantz@gmail.com
2018-02-08
 
 
 
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February CMC Meeting

February CMC Meeting

Come join the CMC for our monthly meeting!

date

Monday, February 12, 2018
12:00pm to 2:00pm

location

2018-02-12
 
 
 
 
Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Paul Wennberg

Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Paul Wennberg

Title: “Improving Air Quality: Is less NOx always better?”

Abstract: Regulations aimed at improving air quality in urban areas like Los Angeles have made rapid progress on reducing nitric oxide and hydrocarbon emissions. As old cars have been taken off the street in favor of cleaner new cars and diesel trucks have been retrofitted or replaced, nitric oxide emissions have dropped rapidly. During the last decade, for example, the amount of nitric oxide in Los Angeles's air has dropped by half. Air pollution regulations have also led to reductions in hydrocarbon emissions, but unlike NOx, these decreases are slowing. Hydrocarbons come from a variety of sources, making control strategies more challenging. For example, these compounds are released by the two-cycle engines used in leaf blowers and lawn mowers -- equipment that tends to stay in service longer than cars and is subject to fewer regulations. Thus, we are now entering a phase where declining NOx emissions are not matched by declining hydrocarbon emissions – a phase with little precedent. With respect to ozone levels, there is now significant evidence that we are headed the wrong way in Los Angeles. Improvements in aerosol burden have also slowed. Some of this has been predicted by standard air quality models, but emerging research described here suggests that air quality in a low-NOx / high hydrocarbon world may be worse than anticipated.

Bio: Paul Wennberg is the R. Stanton Avery Professor of Atmospheric Chemistry and Environmental Engineering at the California Institute of Technology. He also serves as Director of The Linde Center for Global Environmental Science. He joined Caltech in 1998 after receiving a B.A. from Oberlin College and a Ph.D. from Harvard (both in Chemistry). His research focuses on atmospheric composition. To study the long lived greenhouse gases, he is the Chair of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network and a science team member of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory mission (OCO-2). For air quality, his research group has invented new methods for quantifying gas-phase organic oxidation products in the atmosphere and participates in NASA and NSF funded field activities designed to improve our understanding of air quality and climate.

date

Friday, February 16, 2018
3:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium, Room 338

resources

Event Type

DLS

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2018-02-16
 
 
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