Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

The socio-spatial dimensions of disaster risk in mobile home parks: Learning from the 2013 Colorado floods by Andrew Rumbach, Urban and Regional Planning, University of Colorado Denver

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Andrew RumbachBiography: Andrew Rumbach is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Planning and Design at the University of Colorado Denver. His research centers on community risk and resilience to natural hazards and climate change, in the United States and India. He is especially interested in how planning and urban governance shapes the geographies of risk and resilience in cities. His current research projects include a longitudinal study of household and community recovery after the 2013 Colorado floods; an examination of the role of collaborative networks in protecting historic resources from environmental hazards; and a study of small cities and environmental risk in the Darjeeling-Sikkim region of eastern India. Rumbach holds a doctorate and a master’s degree in City and Regional Planning from Cornell University and a bachelor’s in Political Science from Reed College.

date

Wednesday, November 1, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

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Event Type

CSTPR
2017-11-01
 
 
Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. John J. Clague

Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. John J. Clague

Title: (Danger from the sea – Sea-level rise in a changing climate)

Abstract: The rise in ocean levels is among the most dangerous of the many secondary effects of near-future climate warming. On a global scale, sea level is currently rising at an average rate of about 3.5 mm/yr; this rate is nearly 50% higher than rates during the first half of the past century. Sea-level rise has been driven by a nearly 1oC rise in average Earth surface temperature since the early 1900s and, more specifically, has resulted from the loss of alpine glacier ice cover and thermal expansion of ocean waters. A further minimum 1oC rise in average global temperature is ‘locked in’, perhaps before the middle of this century. Continuing warming will ensure that the sea surface will continue to rise, likely reaching an average level nearly 1 m higher than today by the end of the century. This rate of sea-level rise is without precedent in the Holocene and matches some of the highest rates of the Pleistocene Epoch.

Recently, a group of respected climate scientists argued that IPCC has underestimated the amount of sea-level rise by the end of this century due to as yet poorly understood contributions of water from Greenland and Antarctica. Uncertainties in future rates and magnitudes of sea-level rise stem largely from two sources – future anthropogenic carbon emissions and poor knowledge of how rapidly Earth’s cryosphere will equilibrate to the warmer climate we face. Projected costs of protecting existing low-lying coastal infrastructure from higher seas could amount to hundreds of trillions of dollars. However, even with a massive effort, traditional engineering measures, mainly sea dykes, will be effective only for 1-2 m of sea-level rise. Displacement of hundreds of millions of people from low-lying coastal areas, with attendant social disruption and strife, will accompany sea-level rise more than 2 m.

Bio: John Clague is Emeritus Professor at Simon Fraser University. He was educated at Occidental College (BA), the University of California Berkeley (MA), and the University of British Columbia (PhD). Clague worked as a Research Scientist with the Geological Survey of Canada from 1975 until 1998. In 1998 he accepted a faculty position in Department of Earth Sciences at Simon Fraser University. He is currently Director of the Centre for Natural Hazard Research at SFU. Clague is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, former President of the Geological Association of Canada, and Past-President of the International Union for Quaternary Research and the Association of Professional Engineers and Geoscientists of British Columbia (APEGBC). He is recipient of the Geological Society of America Burwell Award, the Royal Society of Canada Bancroft Award, APEGBC’s Innovation Editorial Board Award, the Geological Association of Canada’s (GAC) E.R.W Neale Medal, and GAC’s Logan Medal and Ambrose Medal. He was the 2007-2008 Richard Jahns Distinguished Lecturer for the Geological Society of America and Association of Environmental and Engineering Geology and received an Honorary PhD from the University of Waterloo in 2017.

 

date

Friday, November 3, 2017
3:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium, Room 338

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Event Type

DLS

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Refreshments provided

2017-11-03
 
 
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CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Improving scientific input to global policymaking by Susan Avery, President Emeritus, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

Susan AveryBiography: Dr. Susan Avery is an atmospheric physicist with extensive experience as a leader within scientific institutions.  Avery was the President and Director of WHOI from 2008-2015, the first atmospheric scientist and the first female scientist to take the position of director in the WHOI's history.  Under Avery’s leadership, WHOI increased the application of its knowledge to societal issues, providing high-quality data and analysis across a range of topics, from climate to biodiversity to resources to natural hazards mitigation. Dr. Avery came to WHOI from the University of Colorado at Boulder (UCB), where she most recently served as interim dean of the graduate school and vice chancellor for research. From 1994-2004, Avery served as director of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES), a 550-member collaborative institute between UCB and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Avery was the first woman and first engineer to lead CIRES. Dr. Avery was a member of the faculty of the University of Colorado at Boulder since 1982, most recently holding the academic rank of professor of electrical and computer engineering. Dr. Avery’s research interests include studies of atmospheric circulation and precipitation, climate variability and water resources, and the development of new radar techniques and instruments for remote sensing. She also has a keen interest in scientific literacy and the role of science in public policy. She is the author or co-author of more than 80 peer-reviewed articles. In 2013, Dr. Avery was named to the United Nations’ newly created Scientific Advisory Board that provides advice on science, technology and innovation for sustainable development. Dr. Avery is a fellow of both the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers and of the American Meteorological Society, for which she also served as president. She is a past chair of the board of trustees of the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research.

date

Wednesday, November 8, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2017-11-08
 
 
 
 
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CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

AAAS "Catalyzing Advocacy in Science and Engineering" workshop student competition panel discussion

Past competition winners, Adalyn Fyhrie, Carrie Havrilla, Angela Boag, and Nicholas Valcourt
Moderator: Heather Bené, University of Colorado Office of Government Relations

This talk will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

date

Wednesday, November 29, 2017
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2017-11-29