Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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EU Discussion Series at CSTPR

EU Discussion Series at CSTPR

The EU Discussion Series at CSTPR

Augusto González, Adviser at the Directorate General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, will deliver a series of 8 seminars on EU, ranging from fundamental institutional aspects to current EU priorities

Session 4: The EU Top Ten Priorities
   
Lecturer: Augusto González – European Commission

This next seminar will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

date

Wednesday, November 2, 2016
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-11-02
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Uh-Oh. Abrupt Collapse of an Arctic Ice Cap

by Dr. Michael Willis - Assistant Professor of Geodesy and Remote Sensing, CIRES and Department of Geological Sciences

Cold-based and polythermal ice caps that flow by internal deformation are predicted to evolve slowly in response to changes in climate. Past work suggests that such ice caps in the Russian High Arctic (RHA) are small contributors to sea level at present, even though the region is warming rapidly. Over the coming decades, ice mass loss from the RHA is expected to accelerate based on ensemble models. Our works  highlights unprecedented behavior and rapidly evolving dynamics at one ice cap in the central RHA that may provide an indication that this transition is capable of happening sooner than expected. Satellite radar remote sensing from 1996 indicates that the western margin of Vavilov Ice Cap (area 1,820 km2; location 79.3ºN, 94.4ºE) on October Revolution Island, Severnaya Zemlya, flowed westwards at an average rate of 20 m/year, a speed maintained through 2012; however, by the spring of 2016 glacier sliding speeds surpassed 9,000 m/year. The greatest acceleration in speed occurred while the ice front advanced ~2 km over weak marine sediments and developed a floating terminus. The terminus advance is driven by long-term changes in precipitation patterns amplified by a change in basal conditions at the ice front. The newly-activated outlet glacier is transferring mass rapidly from an area grounded above sea level, deep in the interior of the ice cap, causing thinning rates there of more than 0.30 m/day in 2016. This extraordinary event shows that slowly deforming glaciers, with a frozen bed and no known previous history of fast flow, can initiate surge-like behavior if changes in the pattern of precipitation or other climate factors allow them to advance over weak marine sediments. This raises questions about the overall long-term stability of cold, polar ice caps, many of which terminate in marine waters, in a warmer/wetter Arctic climate with less sea ice.

date

Wednesday, November 2, 2016
11:00am

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-11-02
 
 
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar

Analytical Chemistry Seminar

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Exploring the Evolution of Biomass-Burning Aerosol in Chambers and the Atmosphere

by Jeff Pierce, Associate Professor, Department of Atmospheric Science, Colorado State University

I will discuss theoretical work on the evolution of biomass-burning organic aerosol in smog chambers and in ambient plumes that shows: (1) vapor wall losses appear to matter greatly in smog-chamber oxidation experiments of biomass-burning aerosol, and (2) differences in fire size and meteorology might impact the organic aerosol (and aerosol size distribution) evolution in ambient plumes as much as differences in emission factors or chemical mechanisms. Laboratory and field experiments should carefully consider these complicating factors when comparing across different experiments and plumes.

date

Monday, November 7, 2016
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274

Amenities

Lunch provided

2016-11-07
 
 
EU Discussion Series at CSTPR

EU Discussion Series at CSTPR

The EU Discussion Series at CSTPR
Wednesdays 12:00-1:00 PM

Augusto González, Adviser at the Directorate General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, will deliver a series of 8 seminars on EU, ranging from fundamental institutional aspects to current EU priorities

Session 5: The EU Strategy for Growth
   
Lecturer: Augusto González – European Commission

This next seminar will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

date

Wednesday, November 9, 2016
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-11-09
 
StoryEarth: Bringing Story & Science of Earth Alive!

StoryEarth: Bringing Story & Science of Earth Alive!

StoryEarth
Bringing Story & Science of Earth Alive!

A live performance for adults (& high school students)
Featuring internationally known storyteller, Odds Bodkin, and Naturalist/Earth Scientist, Martin Ogle

Can a symbiosis of story and science help guide us toward thriving, long-term human life on Planet Earth? This thought-provoking stage performance combines epic storytelling, scientific discourse and conversation to ask big questions: Are ancient stories about humanity and Earth still relevant? Is science suggesting new stories, and, if so, how will old and new stories evolve together? This evening will mesmerize, entertain, and awaken new possibilities!

With phenomenal story craft and musicianship, Master storyteller, Odds Bodkin brings a folklore tale and the ancient myth of Gaia – the ancient Greek Earth Goddess – to life for a modern audience. Naturalist & Earth scientist, Martin Ogle, asks the audience to juxtapose the raw, adult interpretation of Greek myth with the newest scientific understandings of humans and Earth to conceive a new, emerging story.

$15 - general admission; $12 - students (high school / college)
The CU Environmental Center is providing funding for student tickets available at 1/2 price ($6).   
Register with the code "student"

Click here to purchase tickets
For more info, contact Martin Ogle

Co-sponsors: CU Environmental Studies Department, CU’s Inside the Greenhouse, CU Environmental Center, Spellbinders (a nationwide storytelling organization), Parent Engagement Network

date

Wednesday, November 9, 2016
7:00pm

location

Sustainability, Energy & Environment Complex (SEEC) Auditorium, 4001 Discovery Drive
2016-11-09
 
Is academia right for me? - CIRES academic career panel

Is academia right for me? - CIRES academic career panel

Are you considering a career in academia? Not sure what it involves or what options are out there? Come to the CIRES Graduate Association academic career panel and hear three accomplished CIRES scientists discuss their various paths through the academic world. 

Where: Fellows' Room, CIRES S274


When: Wednesday, November 9 from 3 - 4:30pm  

 
Who: 
Kristy Tiampo, Professor & Director, Earth Science & Observation Center 
Mike Willis, Assistant Professor of Geodesy and Remote Sensing
Bets McNie, Research Scientist, Western Water Assessment

Coffee, tea, and light refreshments will be provided
 

date

Wednesday, November 9, 2016
3:00pm to 4:30pm

location

CIRES S274

Event Type

CGA

Amenities

Refreshments provided

contact

Jordan Krechmer
2016-11-09
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Quantifying sources, distribution, and processing of light absorbing aerosols in the cryosphere: A comparison of dissolved and refractory black carbon in polar and high mountain regions

Dr. Alia Lauren Khan - Postdoctoral Research Associate, National Snow and Ice Data Center; PhD, Civil Engineering, University of Colorado Boulder

Light absorbing aerosols (LAAs), such as black carbon (BC), in snow and ice are one of the least understood parameters in global climate models.  This is due to complicated physical processes within the cryosphere and too few in situ observations.  BC is derived from the incomplete combustion of biomass and fossil fuels and can enhance melt water generation and glacial recession when deposited on snow and ice surfaces. Measurements are limited due to the difficulty of collecting and preserving samples for analysis from remote environments. In order to help build a larger repository of ground observations, three state-of-the-art methods were applied for determination of BC concentration and composition in snow and glacial melt-water across the polar regions in the Arctic and Antarctic, as well as major mountain regions such as the Himalayas, Rockies, and Andes Mountains.  

In this seminar, 4 case studies will be presented. The first utilizes a DBC molecular marker method to identify chemical signatures of past and present sources of dissolved black carbon (DBC) in Antarctic lakes, where we found a wildfire signature is preserved in the deep, ancient brines of Antarctic lake bottom waters. In contrast, the surface waters are enriched in BC from fossil fuels.  The second also utilizes the DBC molecular marker technique to explore DBC concentration and composition across a global sample set from the cryosphere. Here we show the bottom waters of Antarctic lakes are surprisingly much more enriched in DBC compared to other regions of the cryosphere. Also, the DBC compositions from samples collected on the Greenland Ice Sheet are distinct from the rest of the dataset, containing a wildfire signature. The third and fourth studies utilize the Single Particle Soot Photometer to measure refractory black carbon (rBC).  The third study also applies spectral albedo measurements and the light absorption heating method to show that coal dust from an active mine in Svalbard, Norway significantly reduces the spectral reflectance of the surrounding Arctic surface snow. The fourth study reports aerosol rBC concentrations in the boundary layer of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, as well as in snow from the accumulation area of the Commonwealth Glacier.  Here we determine that aerosol concentrations increase during katabatic wind events, but there is no significant trend in deposition in the snow pit.

These findings support the importance of real in-situ observations in order to fully understand the role of BC in the global carbon cycle. Also, these ground-based measurements will likely serve as validation for future remote sensing of snow/ice impurities and LAAs deposition models.

date

Wednesday, November 9, 2016
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-11-09
 
 
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar

Analytical Chemistry Seminar

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Industrial Hemp: Opportunities in R & D in Colorado’s Fastest Growing Industry

by Bob Sievers - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Environmental Program, and CIRES; University of Colorado Boulder

“Industrial Hemp” is legally defined as Cannabis Sativa containing less than 0.3% THC, and “Marijuana” is defined as containing more than 0.3% THC. In 2016 in Colorado, the industrial hemp and marijuana industries created revenues totaling $1 billion dollars. To put this in context, this exceeds revenues from grain growing, sports and performing arts venues, or residential construction. It is now possible at CU (and other universities) to perform R & D on the growth, separation, purification, and applications of industrial hemp or marijuana under strict regulations, which will be discussed. Examples of possible uses range from precursors to novel materials and various medical applications such as those outlined by the National Institute for Drug Abuse. Examples are treatment of stress and pain, epileptic seizures, and substance abuse. Development of new separation, analysis methods, and pharmaceutical delivery are important to the success of this industry. Methods for improving bioavailability of cannabidiol have been invented.

date

Monday, November 14, 2016
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274

Amenities

Lunch provided

2016-11-14
 
CIRES Members Council Meeting

CIRES Members Council Meeting

Agenda:

  • By-Laws Revisited
  • Status of Supervisor Reviews
  • Status of Town Hall Meetings
  • OPA Guidelines
  • Membership Chairs Update

Location:

Backcountry Pizza
2319 Arapahoe Ave, Boulder, CO 80302

date

Monday, November 14, 2016
12:00pm to 2:00pm

location

Files

Amenities

Lunch provided

2016-11-14
 
 
EU Discussion Series at CSTPR

EU Discussion Series at CSTPR

The EU Discussion Series at CSTPR
Wednesdays 12:00-1:00 PM

Augusto González, Adviser at the Directorate General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, will deliver a series of 8 seminars on EU, ranging from fundamental institutional aspects to current EU priorities

Session 6: The Single Market Strategy
   
Lecturer: Augusto González – European Commission

This next seminar will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

date

Wednesday, November 16, 2016
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-11-16
 
CIRES’ IRP Poster Session and Reception

CIRES’ IRP Poster Session and Reception

The reception will feature the research results of the 2015 IRP winners, listed below. Light refreshments and beverages will be served.
 
The Innovative Research Program (IRP) is an internal CIRES competition designed to stimulate a creative research environment within CIRES and to encourage synergy between disciplines and research colleagues. The program encourages novel, unconventional or fundamental research that might otherwise be difficult to fund. CIRES-wide competitions are conducted each year to foster an innovative research environment where risk taking is allowed and even encouraged.

Presenters:
 
Hydroacoustic Monitoring of Antarctic Ice Shelf Collapse
Investigators: Anne Sheehan, Justin Ball, Ted Scambos
 
A Low-Cost Ocean Current and Temperature Sensor for Long-Term Deployment in Polar Ocean Environments
Investigators: Mark Serreze, Glenn Grant, David Gallaher
 
Earth Remote Sensing Using Signals of Opportunity
Investigators: R. Steven Nerem, Dallas Master
 
Global Inventory of Natural Gas Isotopic and Chemical Composition for Improved Atmospheric Methane Budgeting
Investigators: John Miller, Stefan Schwietzke, Owen Sherwood
 
Modeling of Scale-dependent Stochastic Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Coupling Processes
Investigators: Tomoko Matsuo, Debashis Paul
 
Lidar Profiling Water Temperature in the Ocean: A Promising New Technology to Explore the Ocean Submesoscale Variability with Mach-Zehnder Interferometer
Investigators: Wentao Huang, Xinzhao Chu, Ralph Milliff, John Smith
 
Dynasonde Tomography: Probing Atmosphere with Acoustic Gravity Waves
Investigators: Oleg Godin, Nikolay Zabotin
 
Network Theory to Understand Cloud Systems
Investigators: Graham Feingold, Franziska Glassmeier
 
Mapping avalanche starting zone snow depth with a ground-based LiDAR
Investigators: Jeffrey Deems, Richard Armstrong

date

Thursday, November 17, 2016
4:00pm to 5:30pm

location

CIRES Atrium

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2016-11-17
 
 
 
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Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

The Polar Research Coordination Network aims to connect the Polar Science, Data and High-Performance Computing (HPC) communities to enable deeper penetration of computing methods and cyberinfrastructure into the polar sciences. CU Boulder has strengths in each of these communities - in this seminar/discussion 5 presenters from the polar and research computing communities will share their experiences in working across disciplinary boundaries. We will discuss successes, barriers, and ways forward to identify ways to improve these collaborations and share with the broader research coordination network. If you have interest or experience in working across polar science / research computing disciplinary boundaries, then we welcome your attendance and participation! 

Presenters: TBD from NSIDC/CIRES, Research Computing, and NCAR

Conveners: Allen Pope (NSIDC) and Shelley Knuth & Bruce Loftis (Research Computing)

date

Tuesday, November 22, 2016
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-11-22
 
 
 
 
 
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