Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

The Sociology of Sea Ice Visualizations: 14 preliminary swaths 

Mark Vardy

Postdoctoral Research Associate, Princeton Environmental Institute, Princeton University 

Representations of sea ice occupy an unique location at the intersection of multiple flows of knowledge and power, including the politics of contested geopolitical, Indigenous and scientific priorities. At the same time, the Enlightenment model of the relation between science and society – i.e., that science discovers the truth of the world for decision-makers act upon rationally – does not have universal legitimacy, and the concern with rapid climate change necessitates an updated conception of the role science can play in formulating ethical and agile responses to climatic changes. For this talk, I first outline the motivation for my sociological study of sea ice, and then I report preliminary findings from initial research interviews I conducted with the Arctic Sea Ice News & Analysis team at NSIDC. Through the sociological analysis of the production of sea ice visualizations, I advance an empirically robust and theoretically sound interpretation of the relation between scientific knowledge, ethics and action. 

 

date

Wednesday, September 7, 2016
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-09-07
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

Collaborating for System Change: Learning Networks for City Resilience, Wildfire Protection, Climate Adaptation, and Impactful Science

Bruce Evan Goldstein, University of Colorado Boulder
Claire Chase, University of Colorado Boulder
Lee Frankel-Goldwater, University of Colorado Boulder
Jeremiah Osborne-Gowey, University of Colorado Boulder
Julie Risien, Oregon State University
Sarah Schweizer, University of Colorado Boulder

We consider how learning networks build capacity for system transformation. We define learning networks as inter-organizational voluntary collaboratives that nurture professional expertise, and describe their potential to catalyze systemic change by disrupting old habits, fostering new relationships, and providing freedom to experiment. We underscore the complexity of designing, facilitating, and sustaining learning networks, noting four distinct ways learning networks can foster systemic resilience, 1) social-psychological 2) engineering 3) social-ecological, and 4) emancipatory. We then describe our research methods and introduce four learning network case study analyses, in order of their age and relative progress towards transformation:
•    National Alliance for Broader Impacts (NABI)
•    100 Resilient Cities Network (100RC)
•    Fire Adapted Community Learning Network (FACNet)
•    START (Global Change SysTem for Analysis, Research & Training)

After describing each network’s origins, approach to promoting transformative change, and structure, we apply three exploratory questions across our cases:
•    How do network facilitators “netweave” within and across participating sites?
•    Is there evidence of organizational learning taking place in each network over time?
•    What transformative capacity do we see developing in each network?

We conclude by describing the contribution of this analysis to a framework we are developing to explore how learning networks foster resilience within, between, and across scales.

date

Wednesday, September 7, 2016
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-09-07
 
 
 
 
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CMC Minutes Sept. 12, 2016

CMC Minutes Sept. 12, 2016

CMC Minutes

September 12th 2016

NOAA DSRC Room 3C404

 

In attendance:  Rick Tisinai (CSD), Craig Hartsough (GSD), Amanda Morton (Outreach), Lucia Harrop (CIRES Admin), Mimi Hughes (PSD), Carrie Morrill (NCEI), Gina Brewer (NCEI), Anoniette Capotondi (PSD), Nathan Campbell (CIRES IT), Carrie Bell (NCEI), Chance Sterling (GMD), Kathy Lantz (GMD), Alan Pope (NSIDC)

 

Guests: Chelsea Thompson (CSD), Patrick Veres (CSD), Eric Adamson (SWPC)

All three guests are prospective CMC members

 

Chairperson Christine Holt has left CIRES as of August 2016, and Vice Chairperson Anne Perring is on maternity leave.

A quorum was reached

 

12:00 – 12:15 Lunch (brown bag)

 

The meeting was called to order by Rick Tisinai (Secretary) at 12:14 pm

 

Announcements:

Anne Perring is having her baby today!

• Next month is the CMC elections - current members and prospective members are encouraged to consider positions for Chairperson, Vice Chairperson, Secretary, Membership chairperson, and Rendezvous Chairperson.

 

The new CMC by-Laws: a discussion regarding the current version of Article 3, paragraph 4 (“If a CMC member’s constituents express a wish…”) needed CMC input as to how it should be handled.

From the previous By-Laws, the CIRES Director’s approval was required for a CMC member’s removal. The discussion was to continue this or change it?

The decision was to change the By-Laws as follows:

The CMC itself would determine whether to keep or remove the representative in question, without requiring approval from the CIRES Director. The CMC Chairperson would inform CIRES Administration if the representative was replaced.

A vote was held, and it was unanimously approved to change the By-Laws accordingly.

Rick and Craig will hammer out the wording for this section and send the By-Laws document out to the CMC for ratification via email.

Reflections on the CIRES Review: Antoniette, Kathy, Nate and Rick shared experiences from the CIRES Review, held August 29-31, 2016.

• Generally, a very good experience, with good presentations and smooth operations. Waleed had sent a message to the CIRES scientists announcing that it was well done. The unofficial assessment was a “thumbs up” from the review committee. They will send an official document at a later time.

 

CIRES Bike Helmets: Though the helmets had been missing, it turns out they were located and put back shortly after noticing they were gone. Chance had helped locate and replace the helmets. Therefore, there are no missing helmets. There are markings on the helmets to show they are CIRES-owned, but perhaps more obvious markings would be better to help remind people to put them back! Lucia will look into this.

Town Meetings: Rick announced that “this is the season” to prompt Waleed to commit to scheduling his Town Hall meetings for the three CIRES campuses. At this point, it can start with a meeting with Kristen Averyt to pass on our request for Waleed’s schedule. In addition, the CMC needs to prepare to host these events, by having CMC representatives there to introduce Waleed!

Renewing the committee to finalize the Supervisor’s Evaluation document: Craig said he will be meeting Christina to check in on the status. It has not been fully vetted by the CMC, so not ready to submit to Waleed. However, Waleed is waiting for this document! When we have the update from Christina, we can form a new committee to finalize it in the October meeting.

No Reports from the Fellows or Executive Committees this month – Carrie announced that the two committees get back together later this month.

 

New Business:

With the budget limit for paid lunches from CIRES, the struggles and general frustration has returned within the CMC regarding ever-changing meeting places and especially, accessibility. There was unanimous consensus on this point. Additionally, the CMC agreed that we have tried in good faith to adjust to the budget change.

On September 6th, Rick sent an email message (Lucia cc’d) to Gretchen Richards asking about our current balance on the CMC lunch budget. There was no reply. This full issue will be taken up by Rick in his meeting with Kristen Averyt.

It was also discussed to have email list of CIRES members by Lab to help CMC members easily communicate with their constituents. Nate said he could do this with CIRES IT resources.

Nate also asked the current CMC officers if they could access the CMC websites and it seems that access is still not quite working. There are two CMC sites: one is the public-facing site, which has read/write permissions for the Officers, and the internal site which does not have any read/write access for anyone other than CIRES IT.

In the public-facing site, CMC members can update their CMC profile. Pictures for each CMC member can be taken by either the University (Lucia and Amanda described this) or Will Von Dauster at NOAA (described by Chelsea Thompson).

 

Follow-up:

To get pictures from the University (free) as previously sent by Lucia, contact:

http://www.colorado.edu/strategicrelations/our-services/faculty-staff-portraits

To get a picture taken by Will Von Dauster at NOAA, contact him at:

will.vondauster@noaa.gov

date

Monday, September 12, 2016
12:00pm
2016-09-12
 
CIRES Members Council Monthly Meeting

CIRES Members Council Monthly Meeting

Agenda

12:00-12:15: Arrive, eat

Announcements:

  • Anne Perring is having her baby!
  • CMC Elections next month

Topics for This meeting:

  • The new CMC By-Laws
  • The CIRES Review
  • CIRES Bike Helmets
  • Town Meetings
  • Renewing the committee for finalizing the Supervisor's Evaluation document

Reports from Fellows and Executive Committee Meetings

New Business?

date

Monday, September 12, 2016
12:00pm to 2:00pm

location

NOAA David Skaggs building, Room 3C405
2016-09-12
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

The Pluto System as Revealed by New Horizons

Dr. Kelsi Singer - Postdoctoral Researcher, ​Southwest Research Institute

Abstract: In July of 2015 the New Horizons spacecraft flew through the Pluto system, completing humanity’s reconnaissance of the classical planets.  Pluto turned out to be a world of remarkable geologic diversity, and its terrains display a range of ages, suggesting geologic activity of various forms has persisted for much of Pluto’s history.   Pluto’s atmosphere was found to be more compact, and with lower escape rates, than previously predicted.  Hi-phase images looking back at Pluto’s atmosphere led to the discovery of numerous haze layers.  We are in the beginning stages of understanding this complex world, but I will highlight what we have learned so far and present the latest images and results.  I will also discuss in more detail my work on the crater retention ages of the different surface units of Pluto and its moons, and some of the unique geologic features seen on Pluto and Charon, including a putative cryovolcano.

Bio: Dr. Kelsi Singer is a postdoctoral researcher at Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, CO working on NASA’s New Horizons mission.  Dr. Singer’s graduate work at Washington University in St. Louis focused on the geology and geophysics of icy satellites, and she also studies impact cratering across the solar system.

date

Wednesday, September 14, 2016
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-09-14
 
EU Discussion Series at CSTPR

EU Discussion Series at CSTPR

The EU Discussion Series at CSTPR
Wednesdays 12:00-1:00 PM

Augusto González, Adviser at the Directorate General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, will deliver a series of 8 seminars on EU, ranging from fundamental institutional aspects to current EU priorities

Session 1: September 14
THE EU TREATIES
   
Lecturer: Augusto González – European Commission

date

Wednesday, September 14, 2016
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-09-14
 
CGA Beyond Academia Career Panel

CGA Beyond Academia Career Panel

More coming soon

date

Thursday, September 15, 2016
3:00pm to 4:30pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

Event Type

CGA

Amenities

Refreshments provided

contact

Jordan Krechmer
2016-09-15
 
 
 
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Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Dusting for the fingerprints of dust-on-snow in the Upper Colorado River Basin

Dr. Mark Raleigh, CIRES Visiting Postdoc, University of Colorado Boulder

Abstract: The deposition of desert dust on seasonal snow and glaciers alters the surface energy balance, specifically through enhanced absorption of shortwave radiation.  In the Upper Colorado River Basin (UCRB), the increased radiative forcing with dust-on-snow has advanced snowmelt on the order of 3 to 7 weeks. From a hydrologic perspective, this shift in snowmelt timing is problematic, as there is evidence that it has increased evapotranspiration and decreased annual streamflow in the UCRB. Dust is furthermore problematic because operational river forecasting models do not account for perturbations in snow albedo with dust deposition, and degradation in model accuracy has been linked to extremes in dust-on-snow loading.

Expanded monitoring of dust-on-snow in the UCRB with in situ observations and remote sensing began in the early 2000s and this relatively short record shows considerable interannual variability in dust conditions. Extending knowledge about annual dust-on-snow conditions in the UCRB prior to the 21st century would provide context for changes in the water balance and could benefit the calibration of operational river forecasting models.  This project aims to identify the fingerprint of dust-on-snow as can be inferred from operational measurements, models, and remote sensing, and to extend the dust record in the UCRB back to the mid-1980s.  In this presentation, I will focus on how SNOTEL data may provide clues about interannual and spatial changes in dust-on-snow in the UCRB.  I will also present preliminary work comparing dust-on-snow signatures from MODIS and Landsat.

date

Wednesday, September 21, 2016
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-09-21
 
EU Discussion Series at CSTPR

EU Discussion Series at CSTPR

The EU Discussion Series at CSTPR
Wednesdays 12:00-1:00 PM

Augusto González, Adviser at the Directorate General for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs, will deliver a series of 8 seminars on EU, ranging from fundamental institutional aspects to current EU priorities

Session 2: September 21
The EU: Who Does What
   
Lecturer: Augusto González – European Commission

This next seminar will be available via live webcast. To view the live webcast please go to Adobe Connect and login as a guest.

date

Wednesday, September 21, 2016
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-09-21
 
FOSEP Discussion Group

FOSEP Discussion Group

FOSEP Discussion Group
How the presidential candidates answered 20 science questions

Preparation: Read the candidates responses at sciencedebate.org/20answers

date

Thursday, September 22, 2016
1:00pm to 2:00pm

location

CIRES 340

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-09-22
 
Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Thomas Painter

Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Thomas Painter

A snow hydrologist's apology: Ruining the mystery of mountain snows

Abstract:  Despite snow covered area being the first imaged geophysical retrieval from space over 50 years ago, the mysteries of snow have remained elusive in the walled mountains.  With climate changing due to radiative forcing by anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions and absorptive black carbon and dust, snow finds itself as an innocent child victim at the war’s frontline.  The global manifest losses of snow and glaciers have compelled us to peel back snow’s mysteries and, with some irony, we can no longer stare at the mountains simply to absorb their isolated beauty. Our community is now on track to determine the controls on snowmelt, the impacts of soot from industrialization, the impacts of dust from land disturbance and desertification, and ultimately the distribution of the very quantity that allows our civilization of the Western US and elsewhere on Earth – snow water equivalent.  Here I will speak to the unveiling of snow’s mysteries through remote sensing advances, modeling advances, and the burn of the snow hydrologist’s missions to measure in the highest mountains.

Bio: Dr. Thomas Painter is a Research Scientist in the Water and Carbon Cycles Group, in the Earth Sciences Section, an Adjunct Professor of Geography at UCLA, Visiting Associate Researcher in the Joint Institute for Regional Earth System Science and Engineering (JIFRESSE) at UCLA, and Adjunct Professor of Atmospheric Sciences at the University of Utah. His principle research interests lie in snow hydrology and water resources, energy balance of snow and ice, radiative forcing by light absorbing impurities in snow and ice, imaging spectroscopy and multispectral remote sensing, and planetary ices. He joined JPL in 2010.

Dr. Painter is a member of the American Geophysical Union, the European Geosciences Union, International Glaciological Society, and Western Snow Conference. He is Chairman and organizer of the Working Group on Light-Absorbing Impurities in Snow and Ice. He is also the Vice-Chair of the Cryosphere Focus Group of the American Geophysical Union.

date

Friday, September 23, 2016
4:00pm to 5:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

resources

Event Type

DLS

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2016-09-23
 
 
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Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar

The Sea Ice Index: A Resource for Cryospheric Knowledge Mobilization

by Ann Windnagel, NOAA@NSIDC, University of Colorado Boulder

Abstract: The NOAA@NSIDC team is the small NOAA contingent at NSIDC that leverages NASA support to develop products for researchers, but also products that are easy for the public to use and understand.  Primary among these is the Sea Ice Index. When the Sea Ice Index started as a prototype sea ice extent product in 2001, no one envisioned that it would become the flagship product that it is today. The impetus for and the history of the Sea Ice Index will be discussed along with its evolution to a product that bridges the gap between
sea ice science and the public.

date

Wednesday, September 28, 2016
11:00am to 12:00pm

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-09-28
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar

CSTPR Noontime Seminar

AAAS "Catalyzing Advocacy in Science and Engineering" Workshop Student Competition Panel Discussion

Abby Benson, University of Colorado AeroSpace Ventures
and past competition winners, Nicholas Valcourt, Angela Boag, and Sarah Welsh-Huggins

Please join us for a panel discussion including three previous winners of the AAAS Catalyzing Advocacy in Science and Engineering (CASE) Workshop Student Competition. They will describe their experiences at the workshop and answer your questions about the program.

About the Program: For the third year CSTPR organized a competition to select two University of Colorado Boulder students to attend the AAAS Catalyzing Advocacy in Science and Engineering (CASE) Workshop in April. Students attending the three-and-a-half day program in Washington, DC, learn about the structure and organization of Congress, the federal budget and appropriations processes, and tools for effective science communication and civic engagement. In addition, students participate in interactive seminars about policy-making and communication. The day after the workshop, students will form teams and conduct meetings with their elected Members of Congress and congressional staff members, putting into practice what they have learned. The competition is supported by the University of Colorado Graduate School and Center for STEM Learning.

Cosponsored by the Forum on Science Ethics and Policy

Abby Benson currently serves as Executive Director of the AeroSpace Ventures (ASV) initiative at the University of Colorado Boulder. In this role, she provides strategic direction and leadership for ASV, a collaborative entity that brings together faculty, students, researchers, entrepreneurs, and industry and government partners to provide hands-on education experiences for next generation aerospace  leaders, support discovery of fundamental breakthroughs, pioneer new technologies, and incubate space innovation. Abby previously served as Associate Vice President of Government Relations at the University of Colorado. In this role, Abby ensures the flow of information between the university and relevant stakeholders in Colorado and Washington, DC, and advocates for increased support of CU priorities, including research and higher education funding and policies, at both the state and federal levels. Abby earned a BS in geology and geophysics from Yale University; earned a MS and MEng in transportation and logistics from MIT; and served as a Marshall Memorial Fellow in 2009.

Nicholas Valcourt is a researcher and engineer living in Boulder, CO. He studies infrastructure in developing communities through civil systems analysis at the University of Colorado Boulder where he works very closely supporting the Mortenson Center for Engineering in Developing Communities. Nicholas has previously consulted non-profit organizations working on water and sanitation projects in Peru, Haiti & Morocco. He is also one of the principal organizers of the Colorado WASH Symposium and EDC Speaker Series at CU Boulder.

Angela E. Boag is a Ph.D. candidate at the University of Colorado Boulder investigating the relationships between climate change, forest management and land ownership. She has a Master’s in Forestry from the University of British Columbia and worked for environmental advocacy organizations before returning to graduate school. Now a member of the Communities and Forests in Oregon (CAFOR) research project led by Dr. Joel Hartter, Angela is studying how changing climate and wildfire regimes impact forest resilience, as well as how private forest owners adapt to these changing conditions. She is passionate about linking social and biophysical research to solve complex problems, and advocates for policies that advance environmental sustainability.

Sarah Welsh-Huggins is a fourth-year Ph.D. candidate in the Civil Systems program within the Dept. of Civil, Environmental and Architectural Engineering. Her doctoral research assesses the economic and environmental life-cycle tradeoffs that arise from designing buildings to be both sustainable and hazard-resilient. At CU Boulder, Sarah has also completed a graduate certificate in Engineering for Developing Communities (EDC). Her EDC fieldwork in northeast India in 2014 led her to pursue a M.S. in Structural Engineering, consecutive to her Ph.D. studies, to investigate the seismic risk of hillside buildings in the Indian state of Mizoram. She is the current Co-President of CU Boulder’s student chapter of the national Earthquake Engineering Research Institute, which supports multi-disciplinary research and practice to reduce global earthquake risk. In 2012, Sarah earned a dual B.S./B.A. in Civil Engineering and International Studies from Lafayette College. Post-graduate school, her professional goal is to lead the creation of new approaches for holistic community and urban planning by improving communication channels between citizens, scientists, engineers, and policymakers. She seeks to promote sustainable community development through interdisciplinary solutions that protect natural resources, mitigate natural hazard risk, and ensure a safe and equitable future for generations to come.

date

Wednesday, September 28, 2016
12:00pm to 1:00pm

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-09-28