Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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Panel Discussion: Power Dialog

Panel Discussion: Power Dialog

discussing Colorado's engagement for a clean energy economy in the 21st century

The Power Dialog will support 10,000 students to participate in face-to-face dialog with state-level leaders in all fifty states about what is needed to shift to a clean energy economy. Here in Colorado, the Dialog gives students and community members a voice in critical decisions that will determine their future, and the future of the earth.

PANELISTS:

William S. Becker
Senior Policy Advisor, Center for the New Energy Economy

Suzanne Tegen
National Renewable Energy Laboratory

David Ciplet
Environmental Studies, University of Colorado Boulder

Rosemarie Russo
City of Fort Collins Sustainability Office

Stephanie Malin
Environmental Justice Colorado State University

MODERATORS:

Kristen Averyt
Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences

Michelle Gabrieloff-Parish
CU Environmental Center

location

CIRES Auditorium

resources

Event Type

CSTPR

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2016-04-04
 
Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Shuichi Ushijima

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Shuichi Ushijima

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Heterogeneous Efflorescence by Mineral Dust Particles
 
by Shuichi Ushijima - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado Boulder

One of the key factors that determines particle growth and heterogeneous reaction efficiency of aerosols is whether the particle is liquid or solid.  Salt aerosols transition between these phases through efflorescence and deliquescence.  Although homogeneous efflorescence has been studied in detail, heterogeneous efflorescence is not well understood.  Here we examined heterogeneous efflorescence by optically levitating single droplets of salt solutions and exposed the droplet to a flow of mineral dust particles.  The impact of mineral dust on efflorescence and the difference between immersion and contact efflorescence will be discussed.

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274
2016-04-04
 
 
 
CSTPR Seminar: Lesley Henderson

CSTPR Seminar: Lesley Henderson

Communicating Plastic Pollution: The (conflicting) values of media producers, scientists & lay publics? 
by Lesley Henderson - Institute of Environment, Health and Societies Brunel University London

Abstract: Plastic pollution is now ubiquitous in the marine environment and is considered to be a growing global problem. Lesley Henderson reflects on a study she is leading at Brunel University London into public perceptions, attitudes and behaviours concerning plastics. This is a unique collaboration involving social scientists, eco-toxicologists and film makers and focuses on the forthcoming documentary film ‘A Plastic Ocean’ (release in summer 2016). How has this film been specially created to raise awareness and bring about social change in regard to plastic? To what extent might there be conflicting values between entertainment and ‘science’ education? She explores the wider role of media in mediating messages and creating ‘frames of understanding’ about the associated environmental and health risks of (micro) plastics and asks ‘What are the limitations and possibilities concerning the use of documentary film for social change?’ The study involves media content analysis, online deliberative survey tools and focus groups. It will form the basis of a larger, cross-cultural project to explore plastics in society and provide insights into how we can involve the public in culturally appropriate education strategies to change our behaviour regarding plastic waste.

Biography: Lesley Henderson is Senior Lecturer in Sociology and Communications at Brunel University London. She has longstanding interests in researching media, health and science, particularly in exploring public engagement with fictional media. She has published in social science, media and medical journals and written books on social issues and political engagement.  Currently she is leading the project ‘Storytelling & Public Health: Digital Methods, Media Advocacy and Social Change’. This examines health and science communication in the age of fragmented audiences, multimedia platforms and growth in ‘entertainization’.

She tweets as @lesleyhenders

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-04-07
 
CIRES Special Seminar: Dr. Eric Lindstrom

CIRES Special Seminar: Dr. Eric Lindstrom

Ocean Observing from NASA’s Perspective
by Eric Lindstrom, NASA Headquarters

Dr. Lindstrom’s talk is sponsored by: CIRES, ESOC and ATOC

Bio: Dr. Eric Lindstrom is the Physical Oceanography Program Scientist in the Science Mission Directorate at NASA Headquarters in Washington D.C. He is Program Scientist for the QuikSCAT, Jason-2, Jason-3, SWOT and Aquarius satellite missions and is the leader for the Earth Science Division Climate Focus Area. He has degrees in Earth and Planetary Sciences from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1977) and Physical Oceanography from University of Washington (1983). His scientific interests include the circulation of the ocean and air-sea exchange processes and include extensive experience in both sea-going oceanography and remote sensing. He is now serving as Co-chair of the international Global Ocean Observing System Steering Committee and Co-chair of the US Interagency Ocean Observations Committee (IOOC). Recently, as Chair of the Ocean Observation Panel for Climate he helped establish a web site of ocean climate indices and as co-chair of the Task Team for an Integrated Framework for Sustained Ocean Observations completed guidelines for system development entitled The Framework for Ocean Observing.
Eric Lindstrom is recipient of the 2013 American Geophysical Union Ocean Sciences Award for leadership and service to the ocean science community.

location

CIRES Auditorium

Event Type

Seminar

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2016-04-07
 
 
 
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CMC Minutes Apr. 11, 2016

CMC Minutes Apr. 11, 2016

In Attendance: Christina Holt, Craig Hartsough, Rick Tisinai, Chance Sterling, Amanda Morton, Robin Strelow, Carrie Morrill, Lucia Harrop, Antonietta Capotondi, Mimi Hughes, Michele Cash, Carrie Bell

[page1image2720]

Announcements, Updates

12 out of 18 members – the quorum is set.

The meeting started at 12:29am

CMC Public page – Nate has a URL for us but we need to get pictures to him when he gets back. The group picture is there, but we need to get active with the updates!

Christina and Lucia discussed some anomalies, and Lucia noted that the new pages have been getting more of the attention. Robin said the launch is April 18th. Christina want to know when the content can be managed by CMC members. Lucia feels it is a CIRES IT question.

Rick said CMC should tell CIRES IT who should have access. Amanda said her group had it open to all of her group, but they pulled that back. Christina recalled that the web liaison needn’t be the only person to update the site. It was decided that the officers would have access for now. There was no vote needed on that.

Amanda noted that we use our Indentikey for logins.

Christina asked is there anything we would have to still have private, behind the public page? Do we still need that site? Lucia said that CMC did have a private page or two that had to do with working documents, etc. Koni Steffen removed it. CMC could ask for it again – Christina asked if the current site is available to all CIRES members? Lucia - yes, it is.

What about truly public facing pages? That is, three levels of web pages! CMC needs to define what goes where on each site.

The brand new site has not been launched, so what we’re waiting for the follow up on that.

Lucia said we could use OneDrive from CU. Rick: could we make a private site on OneDrive for CMC? Lucia said that NOAA people had problems with the OneDrive. Using CU’s VPN breaks connections on the NOAA computer.

Christina concluded that we should still use email. Amanda said CU uses Google so we could use Google docs, in theory – Lucia said Nate has both a NOAA and CU account, so he can test it!

Update on CIRES Review Date

End of July or beginning of August? Still not determined. It has been a scheduling problem with attendees...

New Business

Chris Ennis at ESRL CSD, is retiring and Rick wants to

Might we ask Kristen Averyt about how the CIRES Division reorg is going? Mimi said that those CIRES members wanting to lave and work on campus now wont’ have the letter needed to move. Antoinetta said that PSD now has been denied the opportunity to get funding. Might PSD write proposals via CIRES, and have space on campus to justify this? Right now, it seems that nether Feds nor the “on-campus” requirement let people write proposals. Mimi said we need to have a Fellow sponsor our place on campus. This impact “makes PSD have to fund like CSD” (Mimi)

By-Laws Committee - Rick

The meeting for the By-Laws committee confronted the contrast between actual By-Laws, a document that shouldn’t change very much over time, versus “Operating Guidelines” which we were trying to consider for the By-Laws. They should be separate documents, since operating guidelines can be changed to fit the times.

Rendezvous Committee - Amanda
105 poster submissions! The layout is considered to have Room 235 for food lines and have

more room for seating in the ballroom. The layout from last year was at a bursting point.

A CMC poster? Christina shared a version of a poster Amanda made for us (see attached) on a projector. It can be shared online and we can comment on it.

Accountability cards or “bingo cards” for people to have their card marked off when they visit a poster. The idea of a prize has been discouraged by Waleed.

Chance lamented the loss of the reward idea for the “bingo cards” since we are trying to encourage more mixing between scientists. The group tossed out non-costly ideas for the card reward. Nothing has been decided but there were some good ideas.

Alan announced that the comedy skit will not happen since the people would not be in town.

What about Dave Costa doing standup comedy? What about Nate giving a tour of the new CIRES website? Lucia - what about newsworthy CIRES events (PBS News Hour)? Robin – does Waleed cover this sort of stuff in his talk?

Survey questions for the Rendezvous – Amanda will send the documents (last year’s and this year’s)

CMC shirts? – Carrie M, Chance, Craig, Carrie B, Michele, Antonetta

OPA Committee Reports

Mimi gave the report.

CSD and SOS had an overwhelming dominant input – why not the other groups? Mimi suggested that we announce at the Winter Party how the nominations can be delivered.

Christina requested that the CMC really look at the email announcement from Anne Perring and respond to it to the CMC by Wednesday the 13th.

Christina requested that she be CC’d on OPA messages to Waleed and Lornay to be sure to push Waleed to announce the awards.

Rendezvous Program will need to be presented as a PDF to be downloaded by CIRES members. It will be like the reduced version from last year.

Executive and Fellows Reports

Carrie – no meetings yet this month!

Next meeting will be on the CU Campus! It will be all about Rendezvous

Meeting adjourned at 1:42pm 

date

Monday, April 11, 2016
11:00am

Files

contact

2016-04-11
 
Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Ronald C. Cohen

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Ronald C. Cohen

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

On the Lifetime of Nitrogen Oxides in the Continental Boundary Layer

by Ronald C. Cohen - Miller Professor 2015-2016; Professor, Department of Chemistry; Professor, Department of Earth and Planetary Science; University of California, Berkeley

Nitrogen oxides drive the chemistry of the troposphere, catalyzing production of oxidants, ozone and aerosol. Textbooks describe this chemistry as starting with emission of NO and terminating with the gas phase reaction of OH with NO2 to produce HNO3. Here, I will describe approaches to observing and characterizing the lifetime of nitrogen oxides using in situ and space based observations. In contrast to the textbook story we find the lifetime of nitrogen oxides on the continents are primarily controlled by organic nitrate formation. 

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274
2016-04-11
 
 
CWEST Distinguished Seminar Series: Lauren E. Hay

CWEST Distinguished Seminar Series: Lauren E. Hay

The Center for Water, Earth Science and Technology (CWEST) presents

Hydrologic Modeling on a National Scale

by Lauren E. Hay - U.S. Geological Survey, Denver, CO

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) has developed a National Hydrologic Model (NHM) to support coordinated, comprehensive and consistent hydrologic model development, and facilitate the application of hydrologic simulations within the conterminous United States (CONUS). The NHM will provide accurate and consistent estimates of total water availability, changes in the timing and source of flow, and measures of the uncertainty of these estimates; essential elements in assessing the response of the Nation’s watersheds and ecosystems to climate and land use changes at local, regional, and national scales.

The NHM structure includes (1) a consistent geospatial fabric for modeling; (2) daily and monthly time-step models; (3) the ability to subset and aggregate models (nested models); and (4) multi-basin, multi-step, multi-objective model calibration procedures. The NHM has the ability to address issues regarding the use of measured data sets from continental scale networks (e.g. streamflow and climate) and large-scale datasets (e.g. remotely-sensed data products). Methods for large scale parameter estimation, uncertainty quantification and calibration approaches are also being investigated at the continental scale with the NHM. Current results for CONUS will be presented.

location

CIRES Auditorium

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2016-04-13
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Amanda Lynch

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Amanda Lynch

Linkages between Arctic summer circulation regimes and regional sea ice anomalies

by Dr. Amanda Lynch - CIRES Visiting Fellow; Director, Institute at Brown for Environment and Society, Lindemann Distinguished Professor, Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences, Brown University

Studies of linkages between summer atmospheric circulation patterns and the downward trend in annual Arctic sea ice minimum have suggested systematic relationships between low sea ice years and the Arctic Dipole pattern. While the first order downward trend in Arctic sea ice extent has been strong, particularly in the last few decades, departures in ice extent from year to year are typically the result of large and often partially compensating regional anomalies. In particular, the trend in open water in the Pacific sector has been both larger and more variable than the trend in the Atlantic sector, due in part to the ubiquity of Fram Strait export maintaining some measure of ice cover.

Decadal predictive skill of sea ice by earth system models is increasing rapidly. However, the challenge of sea ice predictability is no more immediate than in the quest for time-sensitive decision support for technically feasible navigation routes with enough skill and detail to predict requirements for ship class. In this context, developing new approaches for seasonal ice prediction presents an important test for our understanding of the evolving system.

This talk will present initial results that combine statistical modeling of ice and shipping costs with analysis of atmospheric circulation regimes using self organizing maps as part of an ongoing project to better understand the drivers of change on critical shipping routes in the Arctic.

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-04-13
 
 
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Megan Claflin

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Megan Claflin

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Effects of Atmospheric Conditions on the Composition of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formed from the Oxidation of Isoprene and Monoterpenes

by Megan Claflin - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado Boulder

Motivated by the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) field campaign of 2013, a series of environmental chamber experiments have been conducted to study the effect of environmental conditions on aerosol composition formed from biogenic VOC precursors. The experiments, performed under conditions that mimic those observed during SOAS, study the secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formed from the oxidation of isoprene and select monoterpenes. The composition of the SOA formed was characterized using spectrophotometric functional group analysis methods to quantify the amount of carbonyl [C(O)], carboxylic acid [C(O)OH], hydroxyl [CHOH], ester [C(O)OR], peroxide [CHOOR] and nitrate [CHONO2] groups in the aerosol. Further molecular analysis was done on select systems using various mass spectrometry methods. By comparing the composition of the chamber aerosol with field samples collected during the SOAS campaign, we will attempt to identify the chemistry that leads to aerosol formation in the southeast US. 

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274
2016-04-18
 
Creative Climate Communications with 7News Mike Nelson

Creative Climate Communications with 7News Mike Nelson

Mike Nelson - Chief Meteorologist
7NEWS Weather Denver

Mike received his degree in meteorology from the University of Wisconsin, Madison. He has been Chief Meteorologist for 7 News since 2004. 

Mike has won 14 Emmy awards for Outstanding Weather Anchor. In 2001, he was recognized by the Colorado Broadcasters Association as their "Citizen of the Year" for his volunteer work in Colorado schools. Mike enjoys sharing his knowledge of the weather with young and old, visiting nearly 100 schools, clubs, and service organizations each year.

location

CIRES Auditorium

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-04-19
 
 
 
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar: William C. Keene

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: William C. Keene

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Marine Aerosol Production, Chemical Processing, and Feedbacks

by William C. Keene - Department of Environmental Sciences, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

Production of primary marine aerosol (PMA) by breaking waves on the ocean surface is a major global source of aerosol mass and number with important implications for biogeochemical cycles and climate. However, factors that modulate PMA production and composition are highly uncertain rendering model parameterizations and simulated impacts poorly constrained. PMA were produced by bursting bubbles from both flowing and fixed volumes of fresh surface seawater under controlled conditions in a high-capacity shipboard generator deployed in the eastern North Pacific Ocean during CalNex and in the western North Atlantic Ocean during the Western Atlantic Climate Study (WACS). Seawater ranged from highly productive (chl a = 12 μg L-1) to oligotrophic (chl a = 0.03 μg L-1). PMA were also produced from fresh flowing seawater sampled at 2505 m depth in which recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon (RDOC) accounts for virtually all organic matter (OM). Bubble sizes, bubble surface tension, and size-resolved aerosol number production fluxes and chemical compositions were quantified. Number fluxes were dominated by particles less than 100-nm dry diameter that were composed primarily of OM. Number fluxes from productive waters during daytime were greater by factors of ~2 relative to those at night and those from oligotrophic waters but corresponding organic enrichments (EFocs) relative to seawater were similar. Bubble scavenging from fixed-volume reservoirs of productive waters rapidly depleted dominant but small pools of surfactants leading to lower number production fluxes that converged towards those for oligotrophic waters. Bubble scavenging from fixed-volume oligotrophic waters had no influence on PMA fluxes suggesting the presence of a large background pool of surfactants. Number production fluxes and EFocs from flowing deep seawater were within the ranges of those from surface waters indicating that RDOC in the surface ocean may contribute to PMA OM emitted to the atmosphere. Subsequent photochemical oxidation of PMA OM corresponds to a potentially important and hitherto unknown removal mechanism for RDOC in the ocean and source for organic reaction products in marine air.

NOTICE:  Since the seminar will held in the CIRES Auditorium, no refreshments will be served.

location

CIRES Auditorium
2016-04-25
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Ted Scambos

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Ted Scambos

The continuing evolution of the Larson B ice shelf system: Cape disappointment

by Dr. Ted Scambos - NSIDC/CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-04-27
 
Visiting Fellows: Special Seminar

Visiting Fellows: Special Seminar

Census of the dead: Relic DNA obscures molecular analyses of soil microbial communities

Dr. Paul Carini, Visiting Fellow (Noah Fierer, Sponsoring Fellow)

It is implicitly assumed that the microbial DNA recovered from soil originates from living cells. However, because relic DNA (DNA from dead cells) can persist in soil for weeks to years, it could impact DNA-based analyses of microbial diversity. We examined a wide range of soils and found that, on average, 40% of prokaryotic and fungal DNA was derived from the relic DNA pool. Relic DNA inflated the observed prokaryotic and fungal diversity by as much as 55%, and caused misestimation of taxon abundances, including taxa integral to key ecosystem processes. These findings imply that relic DNA can obscure treatment effects, spatiotemporal patterns, and relationships between taxa and environmental conditions. Moreover, relic DNA may represent a historical record of microbes formerly living in soil.

Further Evidence of Two Different MJO Flavors in High-Resolution Coupled Model Simulations

Dr. Ben Green, Visiting Fellow (Stanley G. Benjamin and Chris Fairall, Sponsoring Fellows)

The atmospheric, hydrostatic Flow-following, finite volume Icosahedral Model (FIM) has been coupled with an icosahedral-grid version of the three-dimensional Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (iHYCOM) to simulate weather phenomena on subseasonal timescales including the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO). Here, two MJO events are simulated for 32-day periods at very high resolution (approximately 30 km and 15 km horizontal grid spacing) with both the coupled FIM-iHYCOM and the atmosphere-only FIM. Most importantly, these simulations confirm a prior study that suggested the existence of two MJO “flavors”: one that is strongly coupled to the upper ocean, and another that is governed primarily by internal atmospheric dynamics. For the coupled-flavor event, FIM-iHYCOM runs simulate an MJO that agreed well with the observed phase and amplitude; in contrast, the FIM-only runs fail to generate an MJO signal. For the internal-atmospheric-flavor event, both coupled and uncoupled runs generate similar MJO signals, albeit in poor agreement with observations. Additional tests reveal that a scale-aware parameterization for deep convection allows for precipitation anomalies to cluster into larger-scale features than when deep convection is explicitly resolved, although the MJO signal (amplitude and propagation) are somewhat similar. Changing horizontal resolution has a relatively minor impact on MJO characteristics, in line with earlier studies. Overall, these results provide further evidence that both the dynamics and the predictability of the MJO may be highly case-dependent.

A “Flood of Troubles”: Evidence for and Historical Implications of Environmental Influences Upon the Outcome of Valens’s First Gothic War (367-369 C.E.) on the Lower Danube

Dr. Adam Schneider, Visiting Fellow (Balaji Rajagopalan and Peter Molnar, Sponsoring Fellows)

In 367 C.E., the Roman emperor Valens launched a three-year military campaign against the Goths, a barbarian people who occupied a large swath of the northwestern Black Sea hinterland consisting of what are now southwestern Ukraine, Moldova, and northeastern Romania. But the Roman forces struggled to deliver a decisive blow, especially when, according to the Roman historian Ammianus Marcellinus, the army was not even able to cross the Danube River due to severe flooding in the second year of the conflict. Yet, despite only suffering minimal losses after minor skirmishing in the following year, the Goths suddenly sued for peace.

Although the Romans failed to achieve a decisive military victory, historians have unsatisfactorily claimed that the Goths surrendered due to war exhaustion. One possibility that has not been explored is that severe and destructive flooding may have motivated the Goths to want peace despite not being militarily defeated by Rome. Indeed, a close examination of the hydroclimatological causes of modern flood events in the Lower Danube Basin suggests that similarly disastrous ancient flood events could have had a significant hidden impact on the eventual outcome of Valens’s First Gothic War. Moreover, this case study provides an important new indication that climatic instability and severe weather may have impacted Gothic polities in the NW Black Sea Basin during the late fourth century C.E., and thus may have played an indirect and heretofore unexplored role in hastening the decline of the Roman Empire during the decades that followed.

location

CIRES Auditorium
2016-04-28
 
Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Steve Running

Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Steve Running

Is terrestrial net primary production a planetary boundary?

Abstract: In 2012 I wrote a paper postulating that the biosphere might have a rather fixed capacity for terrestrial NPP. This idea was based on our 35+ year time series of satellite derived estimates of annual global NPP. Further, we estimated that only about 10% of global NPP was still available for new exploitation, particularly for food and/or bioenergy resources. This seminar will first evaluate whether my postulate is still holding up. Of greater practical interest may be what are the policy ramifications for humanity if NPP is in fact a planetary boundary. 

Bio: Steven W. Running received his Ph.D. in Forest Ecology from Colorado State University, and has been with the University of Montana, Missoula since 1979, where he is a University Regents Professor of Global Ecology.  His primary research interest is the development of global and regional ecosystem biogeochemical models integrating remote sensing with bioclimatology and terrestrial ecology.  He is the Land Team Leader for the NASA Earth Observing System, Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer, and is responsible for the EOS global terrestrial net primary production and evapotranspiration datasets. He has published more than 280 scientific articles and two books. He was a co-Lead Chapter Author for the 2014 U.S. National Climate Assessment. He currently Chairs the NASA Earth Science Subcommittee, and is a member of the NASA Science Advisory Council.  Dr. Running was a chapter Lead Author for the 4th Assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change which shared the Nobel Peace Prize in 2007. Dr. Running is an elected Fellow of the American Geophysical Union, has been  designated a Highly Cited Researcher by the Institute for Scientific Information, and in 2014 was designated one of “The World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds” in Geosciences. In the popular press, his essay in 2007, “The 5 Stages of Climate Grief” has been widely quoted. 

date

Friday, April 29, 2016
4:00pm to 5:00pm

location

CIRES Auditorium

resources

Event Type

DLS

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2016-04-29