Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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Indigenous Peoples and Climate Justice

Indigenous Peoples and Climate Justice

Indigenous Peoples and Climate Justice

Featured Speakers:

Sarah A Krakoff: Professor of Law, University of Colorado Law School
“Tribal Self-Determination, Cultural Survival, and Climate Justice”
 
Heather Lazrus: Project Scientist, National Center for Atmospheric Research
“Rising Voices of Indigenous People in Weather and Climate Science and Policy”
 
Kyle Whyte: Associate Professor of Philosophy, Michigan State University
"Indigenous Climate Justice, Collective Continuance and Settler Colonialism"

location

Eaton Humanities 150

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-03-01
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Julienne Stroeve

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Julienne Stroeve

Variability in the Antarctic Marginal Ice Zone and Pack Ice in Observations and NCAR CESM 

by Julienne Stroeve - NSIDC/CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

Sea ice around Antarctica reached another record high extent in September 2014, recording a maximum extent of more than 20 million km2 for the first time since the modern satellite data record began in October 1978. This follows previous record maxima in 2012 and 2013, resulting in an overall increase in Antarctic September sea ice extent of 1.3% per decade since 1979. Several explanations have been put forward to explain the increasing trends, such as anomalous short-term wind patterns that both grow and spread out the ice, and freshening of the surface ocean layer from increased melting of floating ice from the continent. These positive trends in Antarctic sea ice are at odds with climate model forecasts that suggest the sea ice should be declining in response to increasing greenhouse gases and stratospheric ozone depletion.
While the reasons for the increases in total extent remain poorly understood, it is likely that these changes are not just impacting the total ice extent, but also the distribution of pack ice, the marginal ice zone (MIZ) and polynyas, with important ramifications for phytoplankton productivity that in turn impact zooplankton, fish, sea birds and marine mammals. This study evaluates changes in the distribution of the pack ice, polynyas and the marginal ice zone around Antarctica from two sea ice algorithms, the NASA Team and the Bootstrap. These results are further compared with climate model simulations from the CESM large ensemble output. Seasonal analysis of the different ice types using NASA Team and Bootstrap shows that during ice advance, the ice advances as pack ice, with a seasonal peak in September (broader peak for Bootstrap), and as the pack ice begins to retreat, it first converts to a wide area of MIZ, that reaches its peak around November (NASA Team) or December (Bootstrap). CESM also shows a similar seasonal cycle, with a peak in the pack ice in August, and a December/January peak in the MIZ. Seasonal variability and trends are further compared between the algorithms and the CESM large ensemble output. Results are highly sensitive to the sea ice algorithms used for analysis and regions chosen for evaluation, illustrating the different sensitivities of the algorithms and CESM to the varying influences of dynamic and thermodynamic processes.

 

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-03-02
 
 
CSTPR Seminar: Lucy McAllister

CSTPR Seminar: Lucy McAllister

Coming to the Rescue? Tech Firms and the Harms of the Electronics Commodity Chain

by Lucy McAllister - Environmental Studies Program and Center for Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Colorado Boulder

Abstract: The leaders of the global electronics commodity chain, multinational electronics corporations, perpetuate widespread human and environmental harms, including the global sale of “conflict minerals” that are used to fund the violence of warlords (Spectrum 2011), the depletion of virgin minerals and precious metals, primarily, from Africa (Boone & Ganeshan 2012), and the persistence of unsafe and environmentally hazardous working conditions at electronics factories in Asia (Zhou 2013). The practices commonly used to recycle electronic waste (e-waste) in the informal sector of developing countries, where roughly 50-80% of the global hazardous e-waste stream is sent, also produce severe harms, including health risks especially for women and children (Frazzoli 2010; Leung 2008; Sepúlveda et al. 2010). Despite the important role that multinational electronics firms play in harming people and the environment, and despite the likely role they play in obscuring their participation in such harms, little coordinated or interdisciplinary research has been done on these issues. Moreover, there is no research on the role that lead electronics firms play in maintaining a positive image amongst the public. The aim of this dissertation is to directly address this gap by investigating whether the role lead firms play in producing severe human and environmental problems throughout the electronics commodity chain has gone noticed or unnoticed by external audiences, and if so, why? Indeed, despite the acute human and environmental issues rampant throughout the mining, manufacturing, and disposal of electronics, research to date shows that consumers base purchasing decisions almost solely on considerations of lifestyle, convenience, upgrades, trends, and price (Brulle and Young 2007). This project therefore seeks to elucidate the many disconnects between electronics commodity chain problems, and consumer awareness and knowledge of such harms. More specifically, I investigate whether the legitimization of electronics consumption is the result of several overlapping ideological mechanisms or tactics employed by lead electronics firms to create quiescence among its consumer base. Using impression management theory, I ask whether electronics firms use divisionary reframing tactics to shift attention away from their detrimental business practices, thereby legitimizing themselves in the eyes of the public.

Biography: Lucy McAllister completed her M.Sc. in environmental studies at CU in May 2013, and has continued within the environmental studies program to pursue a PhD. She is now a PhD Candidate, and has recently been adjunct lecturing at Babson College. Broadly, Lucy explores the business-society-environment relationship, focusing on the role of lead electronic firms in the human and environmental harms of the electronics commodity chain. In the fall of 2013, Lucy was awarded a Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences Graduate Research Fellowship. Lucy’s first public outreach article, “The Human and Environmental Effects of E-waste” was published by the Population Reference Bureau (PRB) in 2013, and the Health and Human Rights Journal published Lucy’s first co-authored academic article, “Women, E-waste & Technological Solutions to Climate Change” in June 2014. Together with Nnenia Campbell and Liam Downey, Lucy has a forthcoming article, “Invisible While in Plain Sight: The World Bank in the New York Times" at Sociology of Development.

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-03-04
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Lucas Algrim

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Lucas Algrim

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Effect of a Functional Group on SOA Yields and Particle Composition from OH Radical Initiated Reactions of Alkanes in the Presence of NOx

by Lucas Algrim - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado Boulder

In a series of laboratory experiments we have identified major products and determined SOA yields from the reactions of C10 alcohol and C12 ketone position-isomers with OH radicals in the presence of NOx.  Reactions were studied with a particle beam mass spectrometer (PBMS), gas chromatograph with flame ionization detection (GC-FID), and a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), among other instruments.  Functional group position had a considerable effect on SOA yields, which is fully explainable by the fate of alkoxy radical intermediates and vapor pressures of resulting products.  Important observed differences from alkane chemistry were enhanced decomposition via α-cleavage, ability of the preexisting ketone to play a role in cyclic hemiacetal formation, and significantly hindered isomerization when the ketone was part of the transition-state ring.  

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274
2016-03-07
 
 
CSTPR Seminar: Reiner Grundmann

CSTPR Seminar: Reiner Grundmann

Media Coverage of Climate Change in a Comparative Perspective

by Reiner Grundmann  - Science and Technology Studies, University of Nottingham

Abstract: Climate change is a global process which is addressed by international institutions but receives different responses in different countries. Countries differ, economically, politically, and culturally. However, much research is conducted on a national basis. This is entirely reasonable given the resource restrictions, both in terms of linguistic competence and amount of data. But it is not adequate for the challenge to understand the differences and commonalities of news reporting across countries. In this talk I will present findings from a comparison of the newspaper coverage of climate change in France, Germany, the UK, and the USA. This research is based on corpus linguistics methodology. I will show that the discourse in these four countries is different in that the press uses different terms to describe the problem, and that it assigns different meanings to these terms. Different domestic policy issues drive the climate change discourse. I will also show who the main claims makers in the media are and that so-called skeptical voices are by far in the minority.

Biography: Reiner Grundmann is Professor of Science and Technology Studies at the University of Nottingham (UK). He has a long standing interest in sustainability and global environmental problems. His research explores the relation between knowledge and decision making, the role of expertise and public discourses, and comparative media analysis across countries and issues. He is also part of a large interdisciplinary project on urban sustainability, comparing the cities of Nottingham, Stuttgart, Chengdu and Shanghai. He is a author of numerous papers and books, co-author of the Hartwell Paper for a reorientation of climate policy, and blogger at Klimazwiebel. He tweets as @ReinerGrundmann.

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-03-09
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Andrew Barrett

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Andrew Barrett

How much water do glaciers and snow cover contribute to runoff from High Mountain Asia?

by Andrew Barrett - NSIDC/CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-03-09
 
 
CGA Lunch Seminar: Use your online presence to get a job and further your career goals

CGA Lunch Seminar: Use your online presence to get a job and further your career goals

On Friday, March 1 from noon to 1pm in CIRES S274, Susan Sullivan of CIRES Outreach and Matthew Price and Nate Campbell from CIRES IT will lead a seminar on how to set up a researcher profile on the new CIRES website. They will discuss strategies and best practices on how your should present yourself and your career online and the role your online portrait should play in your job search. 
Lunch will be provided from Half-Fast subs. 


If you'd like to set up your researcher profile before the seminar, follow these instructions: 

  1. Navigate to: http://cires.colorado.edu/about/institutional-programs/cires-graduate-association
  2. Click on the "Create a profile" button on the right side of the screen
  3. Enter your identikey. CIRES IT will then need to approve your profile. Then you'll be free to start editing your CIRES personal page. 
  4. Please bring a laptop to the seminar if you have one. 
     

location

CIRES S274

Event Type

CGA

Amenities

Lunch provided

contact

Jordan Krechmer
2016-03-11
 
 
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CMC Meeting Mar. 14, 2016

CMC Meeting Mar. 14, 2016

CMC Meeting, March 14, 2016

The Taj Restaurant

 

In attendance:  Christina Holt, Chance Sterling, Amanda Morton, Rick Tisinai, Allen Pope, Craig Hartsough, Nate Campbell, Lucia Harrop, Carrie Morrill, Carrie Wall (prospective new CMC member), Antoniette Capotonoli (new from PSD!), Anne Perring

 

(Quorum was met – 12 out of 18 members)

 

• 12:00 noon – the group got food

 

Called to order at 12:26pm

 

CIRES Review – April 19-21st. Lucia said this is the first time a review has ever been held in advance of the new contract. Posters are needed by the 19th.

 

Kristen wants 10 CMC members to attend the Review at the reception on the evening of April 19th. Christina suggested having the reps meet and get their information organized. Lucia suggested that we give Kristen the list of reps, and see how that goes. Lucia said there will be no tech needs, other than presentations with the screens and slides. It will be closed to the public. Christina made a list of prospective CMC representative attendees.

 

News flash: the meeting may be rescheduled!

 

Directors’ Award – none will happen this year since the criteria still has not been well-defined.

 

OPA update from Christina – Chris Clack reported that the first set of deadlines have been achieved, and there are 10 nominations, some of them groups. Nate said that the notification of the committee to see the nominations. Outside judges have not been selected, but a list is being made.

 

OPA by-laws suggestion: the names of the committee should be secret? How protected?

 

Nate did not reveal the names of the OPA committee. Chris will meet with the next chairperson on the updates. The box of old OPA notes and ideas was delivered to Chris for review. The goal is to update all the possible conflicts and rules.

 

CIRES Directors request for Rendezvous poster submissions – Rick: no quotas, just what will represent the science. Up to now, it looks like around 108 posters. Nate noted that those that don’t have insideCIRES web access, just contact CIRES IT. The CIRES Fellows have been getting their grad students to submit posters.

 

Discussion:

Rick: is this a new trend for which CMC and/or CIRES IT is not prepared?

 

Lucia and Rick: how do we navigate this poster submission without the Division directors input?

 

Allen – the Science Advisor could give approval for a poster for that Division.

 

Group discussion: Can the Directors have any input on the vetting/approval process? What do they do to handle this if anything?

 

Anne suggested that the CMC, when there is an overflow of posters, get back to the Directors?

 

Christina – what about having the CU and NOAA Labs oversee this submission?

 

Allen – what if a scientist had an Outreach poster? Christina - does that imply a submission to be reviewed by the corresponding Director? Also category for the web submission.

 

It was determined that these (and other questions) will be considered by the OPA committee after the 2016 Rendezvous.

 

Committees:

 

• OPA – already discussed.

 

• Rendezvous Committee: no big updates at this point. There will be a touch base meeting at the end of March.

 

By-Laws Committee – Rick handed out a document that highlighted the proposed changes. Christina asked if a deadline might be included in the By-Laws for the CMC meeting announcement? Nate described the possibility of having a publicly-facing web page that would have announcements, including the CMC Meeting.

 

• A web liason needs to be included in the By-Laws as an elected position.

• Rendezvous committee can be defined in the “Committees” section of the By-Laws.

• Committee chairs will have web page access for their committees, to be overseen by the web liason.

• Chance – the Membership Chair position can oversee the content for the CMC public page. Lucia is currently the web liason.

 

A vote was proposed by Rick and seconded by Chance:

Shall the CMC have a public facing page that does not require a login?

(Christina asked if our faces and profiles could be included? Nate said yes.)

It was unanimously voted Yes

New prospective members – Carrie WallBell (NCEI)and Antonietta Capotonoli (PSD)! Chance has asked them to attend as guests, then will meet with them and if they want to join. If they are interested, he will meet with them to explain their role as a member of the CMC.

There was no Executive Committee meeting in February or March.

date

Monday, March 14, 2016
12:00pm
2016-03-14
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Allen Pope

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Allen Pope

Progress on a Landsat 8 Mosaic of Antarctica

by Dr. Allen Pope - NSIDC/CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-03-16
 
CSTPR Seminar: Sam Schramski

CSTPR Seminar: Sam Schramski

A Real Polêmica: An Approach to Scientific Controversy and its Uncertain Reach
by Sam Schramski

Abstract: This talk will present preliminary research on a Center project seeking to analyze cases of scientific controversy. While the project is focused on the United States at present, the expectation is to broaden the scope to a comparative analysis with Brazil, which is only tangentially part of the proposed project at present. The expectation is to better to understand: 1) the drivers of social constructions and public opinion related to contentious areas under scientific inquiry, and 2) the degree to which social constructions, public opinion, science (or scientists), or political factors such as focusing events, play greater or lesser roles in promoting policy change to solve these problems. Through the study of such controversies, we hope to ascertain the social dimensions of scientific issues, and drawing from various social science fields such as political science and public policy, propose to link those social constructions to policy outcomes. The proposed project will analyze U.S. state-level social constructions and policymaking using the cases of 1) climate change and 2) childhood vaccine adoption to provide a multi-jurisdictional comparative research design, but this talk will present some novelty by approaching the cases of climate change and Zika virus in the Brazilian context.

Biography: Dr. Sam Schramski is a visiting postdoctoral scholar from the Federal University of Amazonas in Manaus, Brazil, and is based out the Graduate Program in Amazonian Society and Culture. He has a PhD in Interdisciplinary Ecology from the University of Florida. Sam has research interests in local and community-level climate change adaptation in the developing world, particularly in the Brazilian Amazon and southern Africa. He spent 2014 working on a field project that included perceptions of climate change amongst riverine populations living in Amazonian flooded forests. Sam is also a freelance journalist, having produced radio stories for NPR and Radio France International, and written blog posts for Brasil Post, Brazil's Huffington Post affiliate. Sam will be affiliated with CSTPR and the Center for Environmental Journalism throughout 2015.

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-03-16
 
Comedy for Climate Change

Comedy for Climate Change

Comedy for Climate Change
Standing Up for Climate: An Experiment with Creative Climate Comedy

Humor is a tool underutilized, and comedy has the power to effectively connect with people about climate change issues. Our event is associated with the Spring 2016 ‘Creative Climate Communication' course (ENVS3173/THTR4173) and the larger 'Inside the Greenhouse' project.

location

Black Box Experimental Studio - ATLAS Building, CU Boulder

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-03-17
 
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Demetrios Pagonis

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Demetrios Pagonis

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Chemistry of Multifunctional Hydroperoxides in Secondary Organic Aerosol

by Demetrios Pagonis - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado Boulder

Multifunctional hydroperoxides have been identified as a product of autoxidation reactions and have been proposed as structures for extremely low volatility compounds (ELVOCs) observed in secondary organic aerosol. The chemistry of these hydroperoxides is complex and challenging to study, as many conventional analytical techniques disturb the peroxide functionality and cause additional chemistry to occur. In this work we are able to produce multifunctional hydroperoxides in environmental chamber reactions as well as in solution, allowing us to investigate their chemistry under a variety of conditions. Observed intramolecular reactions, reactions with water, acid-catalyzed acetal formation and acid-catalyzed peroxyacetal formation are all discussed.

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274
2016-03-28
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: William Colgan

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: William Colgan

New paradigm for attributing recent Greenland ice loss

by Dr. William Colgan - Lassonde School of Engineering at York University

Abstract: There is a growing interest in the partition of recent Greenland Ice Sheet mass loss between surface balance and ice dynamic components. While assessing the contemporary magnitude and spatial distribution of these transient mass balance components is critical to calculating recent mass loss, it is equally important to understand the magnitude and spatial distribution of these components during the 1961-1990 reference climatology period, against which contemporary components are conventionally differenced to quantify “recent change”. In the past year, however, two longer term mass balance processes have been documented for the first time. On centennial time scales, historical aerial photos and analytical modeling have been used to infer a highly negative post-Little Ice Age mass balance around the ice sheet periphery. On millennial time scales, radiostratigraphy and numerical modeling have been used to infer a subtle positive mass balance due to changes in ice rheology in the ice sheet interior. Together, these processes challenge the assumption of near-equilibrium surface balance and ice dynamic components during reference period that underlies conventional attributions of ice loss. A consequence of acknowledging longer term negative mass balance is that recent mass loss since reference period is substantially less than previously assumed. Partitioning recent ice loss within this alternate paradigm suggests that all recent ice loss can potentially be explained by surface balance alone, without invoking significant changes in ice dynamics since 1990. Examining the spatial distribution of mass loss and mass balance components, however, highlights the perils of solving the ice dynamic component of mass balance as a residual.

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-03-30