Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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ENVS Colloquium: Benjamin Hale

ENVS Colloquium: Benjamin Hale

The Lingering Value of Technological Artifacts: A Clog in the E-waste Stream

by Benjamin Hale - Environmental Studies & Center for Science and Technology Policy Research

location

Sustainability, Energy and Environment Complex (SEEC)

resources

Event Type

CSTPR

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2016-02-01
 
Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Abigail Koss

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Abigail Koss

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Measurement of volatile organic compounds in the atmosphere using NO+ chemical ionization mass spectrometry

Abigail Koss, C. Warneke, P. Veres, B. Yuan, M. Coggon, J.A. de Gouw
Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry - University of Colorado Boulder

The underutilized technique of NO+ chemical ionization mass spectrometry (NO+ CIMS) may improve volatile organic compound (VOC) measurement in the troposphere. In this talk I describe the development of an NO+ CIMS instrument and evaluate the usefulness of the NO+ technique. The evaluation is established through labwork using a gas-chromatography (GC) interface, in-situ measurement of urban air using a GC interface, and direct measurement of urban air. NO+ is useful for fast (1Hz) measurement of carbonyl isomers, for small aliphatics, and large (C13-C15) n-alkanes. The NO+ CIMS technique may be an extremely useful approach for studies of SOA formation, photochemistry, and emissions from fossil fuels and biomass burning.

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274
2016-02-01
 
 
CGA Travel Award Winner Lunchtime Seminar

CGA Travel Award Winner Lunchtime Seminar

The four 2015 CGA Travel Award winners will present 15 minute talks on their exciting research results. The Travel Award winners and their presentations are as follows:

Rebecca Rapf: "Sunlight-driven, Water-mediated Synthesis and Self-Assembly of Model Amphiphiles under Prebiotic Conditions"

Brett Palm: "Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation from Ambient Air in an Oxidation Flow Reactor at GoAmazon2014/5"

Magali Barba: "Post-seismic Deformation of Mojave Earthquakes using Full-Resolution InSAR Time-Series Analysis"

Mas Yanto: "Hydrologic Modeling and Parameter Estimation under Data Scarcity for Java Island, Indonesia"

 

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274

Event Type

CGA

Amenities

Lunch provided

2016-02-03
 
CSTPR Seminar: Ines Lörcher

CSTPR Seminar: Ines Lörcher

Climate Change from the Audience’s Perspective

by Ines Lörcher - Institute for Journalism and Communication, University of Hamburg 

Abstract: Climate change is considered as one of the biggest problems humanity is facing today. At the same time, it is an abstract and complex phenomenon and the findings of climate science are often temporary and uncertain. The communication of this scientific issue to the public is therefore a challenge – especially for the mass media as one of the most important mediators. Climate change is ever-present in the media and in the last years, news coverage of the issue has increased all over the world. A research project at the University of Hamburg in Germany investigated for 6 years the overall question in which way media influence the public knowledge about and attitudes towards climate change. Here, the definition of media was very broad as also the meaning of fictional content and online communication was analyzed. In her talk, Ines Lörcher as one of the members of the research team will present results of their various multi-method studies within the project: surveys, qualitative interviews and a broad quantitative online content analysis via manual and automated coding methods of journalistic articles and their reader comments, scientific expert blogs, discussion forums and social media.

Biography: Ines Lörcher is a research associate in the project “Climate Change from the Audience Perspective” (funded by the German Research Foundation) and member of the research group “Climate Change Perception, and Communication” in the Cluster of Excellence “CliSAP” at the University of Hamburg in Germany. She studied at the University of Mainz in Germany and the University of Navarra in Pamplona in Spain and holds M.A. degrees in Communications, Political Science and Cultural Anthropology. Currently, she is working on her PhD thesis on climate change communication in different online publics.

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-02-03
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Lora Koenig

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Lora Koenig

Scratching the Surface: Studies of accumulation and melt over the ice sheets

by Dr. Lora Koenig - NSIDC/CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

Climate change and rising sea levels present economic, engineering, and societal challenges for current and future generations. Two-thirds of the world’s cities have vulnerable populations of five million or more living in at-risk areas, less than 10 meters above sea level. Warming temperatures, amplified in the Arctic, are impacting both the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. In the past two decades, melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet has accelerated, and the total mass loss has quadrupled. NASA’s Operation IceBridge has been closely monitoring both ice sheets since 2009 leading to new discoveries about both accumulation and meltwater. This presentation will explore the measurements used to monitor the ice sheets from space, air and land and describe where the uncertainties lie in future projections from the ice sheets including variations in accumulation and large storages of water, in aquifers, hiding beneath the surface of the Greenland ice sheet.

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-02-03
 
CIRES Special Seminar: Brent Minchew

CIRES Special Seminar: Brent Minchew

Oceans and ice: How ocean tides influence inland ice flow

by Brent Minchew - NSF Postdoctoral Fellow, British Antarctic Survey

Abstract: The vertical motion of ocean tides modulates horizontal ice flow up to nearly 100 kilometers inland in some Antarctic ice streams. The amplitudes of modulation can exceed 20% of the secular flow speed and have been shown to occur at the beat frequency of the two semi-diurnal tidal constituents. This phenomenon provides a useful case where the response of an ice stream to a well-constrained forcing function is observable. Traditionally such observations have been made with individual GPS sites, but here I describe the methodology and results for a full 3D, time-dependent inversion from remotely sensed data. This first-of-its-kind observational dataset provides ice-stream-scale measurements of 3D secular and time-varying surface velocity on Rutford Ice Stream, West Antarctica. We inferred these velocity fields from 9 months of continuous synthetic aperture radar observations collected from multiple satellite viewing geometries with the 4-satellite COSMO-SkyMed constellation. The resulting velocity fields elucidate the spatiotemporal characteristics of the response of ice flow to ocean tidal forcing, providing insights into the mechanisms driving tidal-timescale flow variability, ice rheology, and the mechanics of the ice stream bed.

Bio: Brent Minchew is a glaciologist specializing in applications of remote sensing and glacier mechanics. He recently received his PhD in geophysics from Caltech where he mainly studied the mechanics of deformable glacier beds. Brent is en route to complete his postdoctoral fellowship at the British Antarctica Survey in Cambridge, UK, where he will study spatiotemporal variability in ice stream flow in West Antarctica by constraining numerical ice flow models with remote sensing and other geophysical observations. His other research interests include applications of existing remote sensing instruments to hazard mitigation and the spatial distribution and environmental controls on landslides. Before pursuing a PhD at Caltech, Brent completed B.S. and M.S. degrees in aerospace engineering from the University of Texas at Austin. 

location

CIRES Auditorium

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2016-02-04
 
Panel Discussion: AAAS

Panel Discussion: AAAS

Panel Discussion: AAAS

Catalyzing Advocacy in Science and Engineering" Workshop Student Competition

To learn more about the AAAS CASE Workshop please attend a panel discussion with previous winners of the competition. 

Panelists:

Thomas Steele Reynolds
Steele Reynolds graduated from the University of Kansas with a B.S. in Chemical Engineering. He is currently working towards his Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering at the University of Colorado. His thesis project is concerned with the use of genetic engineering to develop a platform E. coli strain for use in commercial bioproduction. He also serves as co-director of the graduate student policy group, FOSEP.

Christopher Schaefbauer
Chris Schaefbauer is a Ph.D. student in Computer Science at the University of Colorado Boulder. His research interests include health informatics, human-centered computing, health behavior change, electronic health records, and educational technology. He was a National Science Foundation GK12 Fellow and served as the University of Colorado Student Government President of Student Affairs.

Nicholas Valcourt
Nick Valcourt is a pursuing a Master’s degree in Civil Systems Engineering at the University of Colorado-Boulder as well as a certificate at the Mortenson Center in Engineering for Developing Communities (MCEDC). He earned a B.S. in Civil & Environmental Engineering from the George Washington University in 2007 and worked as a water & wastewater consultant on domestic and international infrastructure & planning projects.

Abby Benson (Moderator)
Abby Benson currently serves as Associate Vice President of Government Relations at the University of Colorado. In this role, Abby ensures the flow of information between the university and relevant stakeholders in Colorado and Washington, DC, and advocates for increased support of CU priorities, including research and higher education funding and policies, at both the state and federal levels.

Competition Details
The CIRES Center for Science and Technology Policy Research is hosting a competition to send two CU Boulder students to Washington, DC to attend the AAAS "Catalyzing Advocacy in Science and Engineering" workshop. The competition is open to any full-time CU Boulder graduate student or well-qualified graduating senior in one of the following fields: Biological, physical, or earth sciences; Computational sciences and mathematics; Engineering disciplines; Medical and health sciences and Social and behavioral sciences. Please submit a one-page statement explaining the importance of the workshop to your career development to ami@cires.colorado.edu by February 19, 2016. The evaluation committee will select two students from those who apply. The competition is being organized by the Graduate Certificate Program in Science and Technology Policy and is supported by the CU Graduate School and the Center for STEM Learning. 

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2016-02-04
 
 
 
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CMC Minutes Feb. 8, 2016

CMC Minutes Feb. 8, 2016

CMC Meeting February 8, 2016

 

In attendance: Chance Sterling (GMD), Amy Steiker (NSIDC), Brandi McCarty (CSD)-Guest, Lucia Harrop (ESRL), Nate Campbell (Admin), Craig Hartsbough (GSD), Matt Price (CIRES IT)-Guest, Robin Strelow (Comm.), Rick Tisinai (CSD), Carrie Morrill (NCEI), Michele Cash (SWPC), Mimi Hughes (PSD), Christina Holt (GSD), Anne Perring (CSD), Chris Clack (GSD)

 

Delay getting to the room due to late set up by The Taj

Got seated in the back room of The Taj and then went to the buffet.

 

The group photo was taken by Matt Price.

 

The meeting was called to order at 12:43

 

Director’s award - Chris is trying to contact Waleed and Lornay for their feedback and there has been no response. Chris will continue to press for an answer. Ann suggests giving them a one-week deadline then forget about it until June. So much depends upon Waleed’s interest. There is no separate interface on the Web site for CIRES members to suggest Director’s Award nominations. Chris summarized the situation saying there are “many different avenues” to pursue.

 

Rendezvous updates - Amanda could not make it, but told Christine that things are progressing nicely. There will be no Graduate Student Award this year.

 

Rick described the need to ask the CIRES Directors to review the poster quota for the tent - how many would really represent their science? The benefit could be that there would somewhere around 80 posters that would all fit in the tent. Rick will ask the Directors this following week.

 

Brandi also said that there is a problem where scientist don’t make themselves available to talk about their posters.

 

Ann described that it be about scientists that want to show a poster and represent it, and let that determine how many posters are submitted.

 

Nate described the new way to list poster contributors and their affiliations on the web site by way of pulldown menus.

 

OPA update - nothing now until nominations appear! Chris gave an update on the site noting, that there needs to be a sentence explaining that people that provide references for the OPA nominee may be from outside NOAA and CIRES, such as NASA, colleges, etc.

 

A very tight timeline for Linda Pendergrass - April 4th might be the real deadline date. March 7-11 will be the week to do the final choices, which will provide time to accommodate Waleed’s chance to choose contenders.

 

We will need a CMC meeting or email exchange to discuss the decisions, then March 25th will be the final decisions given to Waleed. The week of the 4th of April will be the appeal start time.

 

Chris said he will need to develop the committee to make the OPA decision.

 

Chris has had people wanting to nominate him, and he feels it is a conflict of interest, so should he be ineligible? Should he step down from the committee? Also, how many times or how many years does one need to wait before being eligible to be nominated again? We need to have something written down to accommodate this sort of conflict.

 

Ann felt that it would be appropriate to post the names of the OPA committee to be sure that there is adequate transparency. These rules might be listed on the old documentation from Deanne. Brandi said that there was some big effort in a notebook, and Anna and Chris said they saw no notebook. Brandi will try to find the material and get it to Chris.

 

(Follow up - Rick had it, and it was delivered to Chris by Brandi!)

 

Nate will allow access to the OPA web site for the OPA committee members.

 

By-Laws Committee

 

Rick said the first part of the By-Laws have been combed through, but it needs to be finished and sent to the CMC for review.

 

Lucia mentioned that in addition to email correspondence already allowed in the By-Laws, that we will be adding “e-meetings” - where we could attend online.

 

Skype for Business is available through CU as per Nate. Amy said NSIDC has used “Zoom.” Ultimately, it will have to be a university owned service, allied by NOAA. Rick and Nate will discuss what methods can be used to legally enact an “e-meeting.”

 

Lucia said there will be some ASA training, especially for those scientists that don’t really interact with their science advisors!

 

CIRES Feedback page: Lucia said that the feedback page input needs to be reviewed, though right now it is somewhat underused. She advocated that the CMC look at the responses. We do have to get back to those people!

 

Membership Chairperson role: Chance described the position requirements.

 

1.      To ensure that we have a full representation.

2.      Meeting with new CMC members to familiarize their place on the CMC.

3.      Survey with outgoing members.

 

Rick said the By-Laws will have a provision to require the outgoing person to find their own replacement, but can ask the Membership Chair to help.

 

Chance then got more details on his list from the CMC members on their affiliations, etc. Lucia has an updated list of CIRES members in each Lab which was good codetermine how many reps should be allotted.

 

 

Mimi needs to find one more person for PSD.

Carrie needs to find one more person from NCEI.

 

Chance will assist them if needed.

 

Nate asked for the chance to update the CMC mailing list. Lucia did do that recently, removing some old names, so the list should be up to date.

 

PSD Reorganization

Christina brought up the question or the PSD purchasing requirements and Mimi said the decision was that the current “non-decision” will stand indefinitely! That did not go well with PSD members.

Christina suggested that the only thing that CMC can do for now is to insist that updates to the PSD status is posted.

Mimi is doing the Colorado Leadership Program with CIRES administration and looking at the Cooperative Institutes employees roles in ESRL: are they aligned with the mission? Are there advancement opportunities? How is morale versus government employees?

Mimi is looking for input from CMC and all CIRES members, but perhaps maybe CERA, etc., as well.

Mimi would like to promote a Mentoring Program in CIRES - one thing that seems to be lacking! Should CMC promote that? No vote taken at this time.

Mimi has a document that shows the questions she is asking the Lab directors and Christina will share that.

Lucia said that with the CIRES Review, CMC may be asked to participate in it. April 18-20.

Brandi requested that CIRES employees, having to accommodate building damage, have some way to get support and materials (such as chairs), and office space. CMC can remind the Lab directors that there can be facilities for CIRES members in a disaster situation.

Meeting adjourned at 1:52pm

date

Monday, February 8, 2016
12:00pm
2016-02-08
 
CIRES Special Seminar: Bill Barnhart

CIRES Special Seminar: Bill Barnhart

Misbehaving Faults: Unraveling Unexpected Fault Slip Behavior with Geodetic Imaging

by Bill Barnhart - Assistant Professor of Geophysics at the University of Iowa.

Abstract: Over the past 25 years, remote sensing geodesy, particularly InSAR and optical geodesy, has transformed the Earth science community’s view of the subtle yet complex motions of the Earth’s surface. By measuring active deformation with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution, these new data sets help to address a suite of fundamental problems in natural hazards, lithosphere deformation kinematics, the cryosphere and hydrosphere, and human-induced deformation. I will discuss recent advances and future directions in earthquake geodesy, focusing on where unexpected fault slip behavior highlights holes in our knowledge and forces us to reevaluate some of the most fundamental assumptions of faulting, such as Anderson-Byerlee fault kinematics. I will argue from geodetic, seismic, and geomorphic evidence that slip directions on the Hoshab Fault of Pakistan, host of the 2013 Mw7.7 Baluchistan earthquake, vary by up to 90° over several seismic cycles. This bimodal slip behavior allows a single fault to accommodate strain partitioning by switching between strike-slip and dip-slip motion, and it provides new incites into the manifestation of oblique crustal deformation and the process of fault reactivation. I will also discuss how I combine detailed geodetic analysis of earthquakes with the signature of past earthquakes recorded in the landscape to bridge the important observational gap that currently exists between portions of a single seismic cycle (geodesy and seismology) and multiple integrated earthquake cycles (paleoseismology and tectonic geomorphology).

Bio: I completed my bachelors of science in Geology from Washington and Lee University in Lexington, Virginia in 2008. There I completed a senior thesis characterizing the deformation fabrics in granites of the Penninic knappes of the Swiss Alps. I then completed my Ph.D. at Cornell University with Dr. Rowena Lohman in 2013. My dissertation focused on developing both new imaging and modeling techniques to constrain active fault deformation and stress interactions between earthquakes from InSAR observations and InSAR time series analysis. These techniques were applied to range of seismotectonic studies including the Christchurch, New Zealand earthquake sequence and triggered aseimic fault slip events in the Zagros Mountains or Iran. After Cornell, I was a Mendenhall post-doctoral fellow at the USGS National Earthquake Information Center in Golden, Colorado. At the NEIC, I worked to integrate geodetic observations into rapid, global earthquake response operations, work that I continue today with collaborators at the NEIC. In 2015, I began my current position as Assistant Professor of Geophysics at the University of Iowa.

location

CIRES Auditorium

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2016-02-08
 
 
Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Garrett Campbell

Cryospheric and Polar Processes Seminar: Garrett Campbell

Sea Ice in the 1960's from Satellites

by Dr. Garrett Campbell - NSIDC/CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

I will review the Nimbus 1 to 4 observations from visible imagery. This will include description of the raw observations and methods for detecting sea ice. Then I will talk about interesting features of the sea ice distribution in both the Arctic and Antarctic. Mention will also be made of observations by the first NOAA satellite: ESSA 1 which collected it's first data exactly 50 years ago.

location

RL-2 (on East Campus) room 155
2016-02-10
 
 
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Benjamin Nault and Jason Schroder

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Benjamin Nault and Jason Schroder

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Chemistry in of the coldest places in the atmosphere: Impacts of updated NOx lifetime and fate on lightning NOx emission rates

by Benjamin A. Nault - Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Chemistry and CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

Nitrogen oxides (NOx≡ NO + NO2) produced from lightning are an important natural source of NOx. This is the most important NOx source for the middle and upper troposphere. Lightning produced NOx controls the chemical production of middle and upper tropospheric ozone, an important greenhouse gas, and the oxidative capacity of the troposphere. However, the uncertainty in the emissions rates range from 2 to 8 Tg nitrogen per year. Recent studies have provided evidence that the oxidation of NOx to pernitric acid and nitric acid is slower than currently assumed and that methyl peroxy nitrate is an important temporary sink of upper tropospheric lightning NOx. Also, the conversion of dinitrogen pentoxide to nitric acid may be slower than currently assumed. I investigate the impacts of this updated kinetics and chemistry on model and in-situ observations of lightning NOx production rates. I show that using these results, the uncertainty range decreases. Also, the emission rates for different regions of the world increase by as much as 33% with the updated upper tropospheric NOx lifetime and fate.

 

Insights into Submicron Aerosol Composition and Sources from the WINTER Aircraft Campaign over the Eastern US

by Jason Schroder - Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Chemistry and CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

The WINTER aircraft campaign was a recent field experiment to probe the sources and evolution of gas and aerosol pollutants in Northeast US urban and industrial plumes during the winter. A highly customized Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer was flown on the NCAR C-130 to characterize submicron aerosol composition and evolution. Work towards constraining wintertime secondary organic aerosol formation and evolution will be presented from a case study of urban outflow from NYC. Observations and results of wintertime aerosol nitrate, power plant plume acidity, as well as measurements made from an oxidation flow reactor, flown for the first time, will be discussed.

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274
2016-02-15
 
CIRES Special Seminar: Adrian Borsa

CIRES Special Seminar: Adrian Borsa

Continuous GPS observations of crustal loading from hydrometeorological events on the scale of storms to drought

by Adrian Borsa - Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography

Abstract: Recent studies using continuous GPS to estimate changes in terrestrial water storage point to a future where the global GPS infrastructure for monitoring crustal deformation can be leveraged for hydrological applications. Seasonal water and snow loading has long been known to generate an elastic earth response that is observable by GPS, but only recently have these signals been modeled to recover the underlying loads at local and regional scales. My work with colleagues at UCSD showed that GPS can be used to monitor subtle surface deformation due to the response of the hydrological system to drought, and to estimate the magnitude and spatial distribution of related water loss. I have recently extended this analysis to the continental scale and will show how GPS estimates of water fluxes by major watershed compare with predictions from land surface models and remotely-sensed gravity observations from GRACE. I have also narrowed the temporal range of this analysis to event-scale loading from individual storms and will illustrate the promise and challenges of applying GPS observations to these new higher-frequency hydrometeorological phenomena. Although focused on the hydrosphere, this work has implications for the use of GPS to study crustal deformation across the temporal spectrum, with relevance to geophysical problems such as seismic triggering and the fingerprinting analysis of vertical deformation.

Bio: Adrian Borsa is a researcher at the Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. His work aims to describe how the shape of Earth's surface is changing at timescales of seconds to decades, and to link observed change to geophysical processes associated with phenomena ranging from earthquakes to climate change. Dr. Borsa's expertise includes the collection and analysis of geodetic data from many sources, including permanent and mobile GPS sensors, airborne lidar, and satellite altimeters. He is also actively involved in the calibration and validation of elevation measurements from several generations of satellite altimeters, and has made the remote salar de Uyuni in Bolivia his field home for the past decade in support of this work.

Dr. Borsa took an atypical route to science, beginning with a B.A. in Government, an M.A. in International Relations, and an early career in international business focused on Japan and the United States. He received his PhD from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in 2005, was posted at the US Geological Survey during his post-doc, and moved to Boulder, CO in 2008 to take a management position within NSF's EarthScope program. He returned to Scripps and to full-time scientific research in 2012.

location

CIRES Auditorium

Event Type

Seminar

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2016-02-16
 
ATOC Distinguished Lecture

ATOC Distinguished Lecture

Stratospheric Ozone and Southern Hemisphere Climate Change

by Prof. Lorenzo Polvani - Columbia University

Unlike well-mixed greenhouse gases, the radiative forcing of climate due to observed stratospheric ozone loss in the second half of the 20th Century is very small.  In spite of this, much new evidence has emerged in the last decade showing that the formation of the ozone hole has caused profound changes in the entire Southern Hemisphere climate system, starting from the observed poleward shift of the midlatitude jet in summertime:this has been linked to changes in tropospheric and surface temperatures, clouds and cloud radiative effects, precipitation at both middle and low latitudes, as well as temperature and circulation changes in the ocean, and possibly the cryosphere.  Similarly, the projected closing of the ozone hole will feature prominently in future climate change, with its impacts expected to largely cancel many of those from increasing GHGs over the next half-century. 

 

location

SEEC Auditorium
2016-02-17
 
 
ENVS Colloquium: Maxwell Boykoff

ENVS Colloquium: Maxwell Boykoff

Navigating Climate Change: Communication and cultural politics in the 21st Century

by Maxwell Boykoff - Environmental Studies & Center for Science and Technology Policy Research

location

Sustainability, Energy and Environment Complex (SEEC)

resources

Event Type

CSTPR

Amenities

Refreshments provided

contact

2016-02-19
 
 
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CIRES Special Seminar: Michael Willis

CIRES Special Seminar: Michael Willis

Here’s Looking at You: Geodetic Imaging of the Earth Using Surveillance Satellites

by Michael Willis - Cornell & University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill

Abstract: A revolution is occurring in the geospatial sciences, enabled by ever increasing data streams and the expansion of high performance computing. Once the domain of large institutions and governments, geospatial information is becoming increasingly democratized, as anyone with a data connection can now access a huge array of openly-available spatial information. Thus far the geographical information revolution has been limited to two dimensions (the map plane). I access the third dimension, time-varying surface topography, with geodetic imaging. My talk will cover the methods and techniques I use and have developed to answer questions on climate change, geodynamics and geo-hazards. The convergence of surveillance satellite imaging capabilities, opening data access and high performance computing allow me to examine vast swaths of the Earth using frequent observations. I will show examples from my recent research on the changing cryosphere and geodynamics, while also highlighting some of the advances made in support of the ArcticDEM project. This “big data” project has, at times, used 315,000 compute cores to produce digital surface models over the Arctic with an equivalent area of the continental USA, in a single weekend. These models will be publicly available and can be used to examine problems concerning changing glaciers, permafrost, coastal erosion rates, geomorphology and geo-hazards.

Bio: Michael Willis (Mike) is a research associate at Cornell and adjunct research professor at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His broad research interests include ice dynamics and the contribution of land ice to sea level, Earth deformation, geophysics and structural geology of rifting areas, geodynamic, hazards, remote sensing, visualization and data fusion. He received his BSc in physical geography from Glasgow University in Scotland in 1997. He studied glaciology and geodesy at the Byrd Polar Research Center at Ohio State University, where he earned both his MSc (2000) and PhD (2008). He did Postdoctoral work at both Ohio State and Cornell University working on a variety of Earth science problems. He still really, really likes it when it snows.

location

CIRES Auditorium

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2016-02-22
 
Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Ingrid Mielke-Maday

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Ingrid Mielke-Maday

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Investigating hydrocarbon emissions in oil and gas basins using mobile platforms
 
by Ingrid Mielke-Maday - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Colorado Boulder

Methane emissions are of concern due to methane’s contribution to global climate change and tropospheric ozone formation.  Sources of methane include landfills, agriculture, and oil and natural gas operations.  Recent studies have focused on determining the extent to which oil and gas operations contribute to methane emissions.  The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s (NOAA) Global Monitoring Division has conducted fieldwork in oil and gas basins in order to characterize and quantify emissions of methane and non-methane hydrocarbons.  Field campaigns from the past two years will be presented.  Measurement techniques and methods, including the use of a mobile laboratory and aircraft, will be discussed.

location

CIRES Auditorium
2016-02-22
 
 
CWEST Seminar: Reed Maxwell

CWEST Seminar: Reed Maxwell

The Center for Water, Earth Science and Technology (CWEST) presents

Connections in the hydrologic cycle: How anthropogenic stresses impact feed-backs, sensitivity and sustainability

by Reed Maxwell - Hydrology and Engineering Program, Department of Geology & Geologic Engineering, Colorado School of Mines

Aquifers are a critical water resource, particularly in irrigation, but also participate in moderating the land-energy balance over the so-called critical zone of 2-10m in water table depth. Yet, the scaling behavior of groundwater is not well known. The interdependence between groundwater and land energy fluxes has tremendous implications for hydrologic feedbacks resulting from climate change and anthropogenic activities. Pumping and irrigation are often overlooked in groundwater impact studies but are shown here to impact water table depth resulting in changes to the land-energy budget. Compounding these interactions, recent climate-exacerbated infestation of the mountain pine beetle (MPB) in the Rocky Mountain west has resulted in unprecedented tree death across the region. The spatial and temporal heterogeneity of the epidemic creates a complex and often inconsistent watershed response, impacting the primary storage and flow components of the hydrologic cycle. Here, I will highlight three research areas within my group: understanding the anthropogenic impacts on the hydrologic cycle, impacts of climate-induced insect-drive tree mortality on the hydrology and water quality in the intermountain west and scaling of groundwater and residence times over the continental United States. A range of approaches will be discussed, including high performance computing and implications for understanding dominant hydrological processes at large scales will be presented.

location

CIRES Auditorium

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2016-02-24
 
CIRES Special Seminar: Ellyn Enderlin

CIRES Special Seminar: Ellyn Enderlin

Chasing Ice(bergs): An interdisciplinary remote sensing approach to study changing ice-ocean interactions in Greenland’s glacial fjords

by Ellyn Enderlin - University of Maine Climate Change Institute and School of Earth and Climate Sciences

Abstract: Over the last two decades, atmospheric and oceanic warming have driven increases in surface meltwater runoff and iceberg discharge from the Greenland Ice Sheet. Although spatial and temporal variations in surface meltwater runoff can largely be explained by changes in air temperature, the link between iceberg discharge variability and climate change is relatively poorly understood. 
The over-arching goal of my research is to develop an improved understanding of the relative influence of changing air and ocean temperatures as well as the internal controls of glaciers, such as geometry, on iceberg discharge. Using remotely-sensed ice thickness and velocity observations, I’ve shown that spatial and temporal variations in iceberg discharge have resulted in large variability in the contribution of individual glaciers to sea level rise since 2000. My ongoing research projects use a combination of in situ and remotely sensed data to investigate potential explanations for the observed variability. In this presentation I will focus on one aspect of my ongoing research projects: ice-ocean interactions. Specifically, I will show how repeat stereo satellite images can be used to quantify spatial and temporal variations in glacier submarine melting. I will also show how a variety of remotely sensed datasets can be combined to assess the influence of changing ice-ocean interactions on iceberg discharge and the freshwater fluxes from the mélange of icebergs, bergy bits, and sea ice in Greenland’s glacial fjords. The results of these ongoing analyses support the need for the continued development of novel remote sensing techniques and interdisciplinary research efforts to improve predictions of ice sheet change in a warming climate and the associated impacts on global sea level and ocean circulation.

Bio: Ellyn Enderlin is currently a research assistant professor at the University of Maine Climate Change Institute and School of Earth and Climate Sciences. Her work aims to improve the understanding of the response of glaciers and ice sheets to climate change. She initially became interested in glaciers when she was invited to participate in a field campaign in the Peruvian Andes while working on her B.S. in Environmental Science at Lehigh University. After returning from the field, Ellyn continued her research on Peruvian glacier change using satellite remotely sensed images and digital elevation models to document glacier recession at the end of the 20th century. Throughout her graduate career at The Ohio State University, Ellyn honed her expertise in glaciology and remote sensing through a number of research projects focused on marine-terminating glaciers in Greenland and Iceland. Since completing her M.S. in Geological Science and PhD in Earth Science at OSU, Ellyn has expanded her research interests to include ice-ocean interactions, her geographic focus to include Antarctic and Alaskan glaciers, and her remote sensing expertise to include very high-resolution stereo satellite images. Her ongoing inter-disciplinary research projects utilize a variety of in situ and remotely sensed observations to study glacier change, including hyperspectral satellite images and data products, airborne lidar and ice-penetrating radar observations, GPS, terrestrial time-lapse photographs, and air and ocean temperature observations.

location

CIRES Auditorium

Amenities

Refreshments provided

2016-02-24
 
 
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Katie Primm

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Katie Primm

Analytical & Environmental Chemistry Division and Atmospheric Chemistry Program Seminar

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Supercooling and ice formation of perchlorate and chloride brines under Mars-relevant conditions

by Katie Primm - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry-CIRES, University of Colorado Boulder

Perchlorate and chloride salts, discovered in the Martian regolith at multiple landing sites, may provide pathways for liquid water stability on current Mars. It has previously been assumed that perchlorate and chloride brines form in the Martian regolith via melting or deliquescence, they would be present only briefly because efflorescence into a crystal or freezing to ice would soon occur. Here, we used a Raman microscope to study the temperature and relative humidity (RH) conditions at which magnesium perchlorate and magnesium chloride brines will deliquesce into aqueous droplets, form ice, and effloresce back into crystalline particles.

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274
2016-02-29