Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 1 - Introduction by Linda Mearns

Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 1 - Introduction by Linda Mearns

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says? This fall's focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I's contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report)

This is a CIRES-ATOC Seminar Series

location

CIRES Auditorium - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-09-02
 
 
 
Distinguished Research Lecture 2014: Peter Molnar

Distinguished Research Lecture 2014: Peter Molnar

The Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research is pleased to announce that this year's Distinguished Research Lecturer will be Professor Peter Molnar of the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences and the Department of Geological Science. Few scientists have consistently tackled as broad a spectrum of challenging problems in the physics of Earth at such a fundamental level as Professor Molnar. What distinguishes him from other leading Earth scientists is the remarkable range of tools that he brings to his work; his observational skills in seismology, tectonic physics, and geological field work; and his extensive theoretical abilities that allow contributions to understanding the related heat and mass transfer mechanisms in solid earth, the oceans, and the atmosphere. Professor Molnar's exemplary scholarship and service reflect the best the university has to offer.

This fall's lecture is 'Did the emergence of Indonesian islands (the Maritime Continent) transform a warm world to one with recurring Ice Ages?' Professor Molnar will argue that when the Maritime Continent arose from the sea 3 million years ago, it transformed tropical climates, which then, due to prevailing atmospheric circulation patterns, led to the high-latitude cooling over Canada that made the ice ages possible.

Please RSVP now to reserve a spot, and mark your calendars for Friday, September 5,from 4:00-5:00 p.m. in Muenzinger E050, followed by a reception in the CIRES Atrium. Please RSVP here.

location

Muenzinger E050 - University of Colorado Boulder, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-09-05
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Rainer Volkamer Group

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Rainer Volkamer Group

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Reactive trace gases in tropospheric chemistry and climate

Reactive trace gases and aerosols are relevant components of tropospheric chemistry and climate. Bromine and iodine oxide radicals, and oxygenated VOC species modify the HOx radical abundance, influence the reactive chemistry and lifetime of climate active gases (e.g., ozone, methane, dimethyl sulfide) and can trigger the atmospheric deposition of mercury to ecosystems. Reactive trace gases are also a source for secondary aerosol mass that modifies aerosol optical properties, and cloud interactions (Earth albedo).

The Volkamer group develops innovative optical spectroscopic instruments (in-situ and remote sensing) to measure trace gases and aerosols, and applies these instruments to conduct field measurements from mobile platforms (vehicles, ships, aircraft) and laboratory measurements in simulation chambers and flowtubes. This talk will present examples of current graduate student projects in the Volkamer group (MAD-CAT, CONTRAST, and FRAPPE projects). Future student opportunities exist in relation with the analysis of data from ongoing field projects, as well as laboratory studies that use in-situ cavity enhanced absorption spectroscopy and mass spectrometry to investigate the role of Setschenow 'salting-in' for aerosol formation. Prof. Volkamer is currently on sabbatical in Europe, and is best reached by email.

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274 - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-09-08
 
Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 2 - Observations:Atmosphere & Surface by Owen Cooper

Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 2 - Observations:Atmosphere & Surface by Owen Cooper

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says? This fall's focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I's contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report)

This is a CIRES-ATOC Seminar Series

For more information please visit: http://cires.colorado.edu/news-events/announcements/new-seminar-series-cires-and-atoc-reading-ipcc-report/

location

CIRES Auditorium - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-09-09
 
 
 
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Carl Koval

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Carl Koval

Research Overview of the Joint Center for Artificial Photosynthesis (JCAP): Development of Scalably Manufacturable Solar-Fuels Generators

JCAP was established in 2010 as one of the DOE's Energy Innovation Hubs.  JCAP's mission is to build fully integrated solar-fuels generators that utilize earth-abundant semiconductors and catalysts for efficient conversion of water to O2 and H2 and for the reduction of CO2 to liquid fuels. JCAP prototypes are designed to enable separation of products and therefore require membranes and complex interfaces between various material components that will function under realistic operating conditions. JCAP's long-term goal is to develop a commercially viable, solar-generation technology that simultaneously satisfies the following four criteria: high efficiency, multi-year stability, low module cost, and safe operation. JCAP's approach to assembling complete artificial photosynthetic systems is to develop robust concepts for complete solar-fuels generators, then to break them down into essential assemblies of components, and finally to adapt or discover the materials needed to fabricate those assemblies. JCAP research bridges basic and applied sciences as well as engineering associated with prototype construction and consideration of scale-up challenges.

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274 - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-09-15
 
Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 3 - Observations: Ocean by Mike Alexander

Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 3 - Observations: Ocean by Mike Alexander

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says? This fall's focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I's contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report)

This is a CIRES-ATOC Seminar Series

For more information please visit: http://cires.colorado.edu/news-events/announcements/new-seminar-series-cires-and-atoc-reading-ipcc-report/

location

CIRES Auditorium - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-09-16
 
 
 
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Joost de Gouw

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Joost de Gouw

Volatile Organic Compounds in the Atmosphere

by Joost de Gouw

Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) are released to the atmosphere from a large variety of sources both natural and man-made. In the atmosphere, VOCs are oxidized by different radicals on time scales of minutes to years. As a result of this chemistry, ozone and fine particles can be formed, which are two important air pollutants and which also play a role in the climate system. I will discuss ongoing research at the NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory that is aimed at quantifying the sources of VOCs, their chemical transformations, and the impact of these processes on air quality and climate. Also, new sources of energy lead to emissions of different VOCs, which is an emerging issue in our research.

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274 - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-09-22
 
Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 5 - Information from Paleoclimate Archives by Bette Otto-Bliesner

Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 5 - Information from Paleoclimate Archives by Bette Otto-Bliesner

ver wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says? This fall's focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I's contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report)

This is a CIRES-ATOC Seminar Series

For more information please visit: http://cires.colorado.edu/news-events/announcements/new-seminar-series-cires-and-atoc-reading-ipcc-report/

location

CIRES Auditorium - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-09-23
 
 
 
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Margaret Tolbert and Paul Ziemann

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Margaret Tolbert and Paul Ziemann

A new mechanism for solid formation in the atmosphere: Contact efflorescence

by Margaret Tolbert

The phase state of atmospheric particulate is an important factor in the magnitude of both the direct and indirect radiative effect of aerosols on climate.  While the homogeneous phase transitions of deliquescence and efflorescence have been studied for decades, there is far less information available on heterogeneous efflorescence.  Here we describe a new mechanism of possible atmospheric importance, contact efflorescence, a process that occurs when a supersaturated droplet comes in physical contact with a solid particle.  A newly constructed optical trap is used to measure contact efflorescence for single levitated droplets exposed to single collisions.  This talk will describe the experimental technique and present preliminary data for contact efflorescence.

Laboratory Studies of the Chemistry of Secondary Organic Aerosol Formation

by Paul Ziemann

In this talk I will describe for incoming graduate students the atmospheric chemistry research being conducted in my laboratory. Laboratory studies provide much of the fundamental data on reaction kinetics, products, and mechanisms that are needed to achieve a deep understanding of atmospheric chemistry and to develop detailed and accurate models that are used to establish air quality regulations and to predict the effects of human activities on global climate. Research in my laboratory focuses on the atmospheric chemistry of organic compounds emitted from natural and anthropogenic sources and the physical and chemical processes by which oxidized organic reaction products form microscopic aerosol particles. Studies are conducted in large-volume environmental chambers where experiments are designed to simulate but simplify atmospheric chemistry and conditions in order to obtain information on gas and particle chemical composition; gas and heterogeneous/multiphase reaction rates and equilibria; thermodynamic, hygroscopic, and phase properties of particles; and gas-particle-wall interactions. Obtaining such data is a challenge, but in this talk I will describe how we approach this problem by using a diverse array of measurement techniques including real-time and offline mass spectrometry, temperature-programmed thermal desorption, gas and liquid chromatography, NMR, spectrophotometry, and scanning mobility particle sizing. I will then provide examples of our use of these methods to develop quantitative chemical reaction mechanisms of organic gas and aerosol chemistry and models of SOA formation and particle properties such as hygroscopicity and describe some ongoing research projects.

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274 - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-09-29
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Deserai Crow, Adrianne Kroepsch, Elizabeth Koebele, and Lydia Dixon

CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Deserai Crow, Adrianne Kroepsch, Elizabeth Koebele, and Lydia Dixon

Assessing Wildfire Mitigation Outreach Strategies in the Wildland-Urban Interface

by Deserai Crow, Adrianne Kroepsch, Elizabeth Koebele, and Lydia Dixon
Environmental Studies, University of Colorado

Abstract: Colorado residents, local governments, and non-governmental organizations are becoming increasingly aware of damages that wildfire – and especially catastrophic wildfire – can inflict on their communities and watersheds.  Because wildfires are expected only to escalate in frequency and destruction in the American West due to regional demographic and climate trends, it is important for policymakers and water resource planners to understand how to best promote effective wildfire risk mitigation techniques among residents who choose to live in the wildland-urban interface (WUI).  What types of wildfire mitigation information do homeowners in WUI zones receive, how is information distributed to them, and what effects does that information have on individual behavior?  This study uses data from in-depth interviews and focus groups with fire professionals, wildfire-focused watershed groups, and homeowners in two communities in Colorado that have recently experienced historic wildfires, as well as a cross-jurisdictional survey of fire professionals in the American West, to examine programmatic efforts used to encourage homeowners to mitigate their wildfire risk.  The results provide insights into constraints on individual and collective capacity, the effectiveness of formal versus informal roles for government, and other findings that may inform more effective wildfire risk mitigation policies in Colorado and across the American West in the future.  

Biogrpahy: Deserai Crow is an Assistant Professor in the Environmental Studies Program at the University of Colorado-Boulder, where she works with Adrianne Kroepsch, Elizabeth Koebele, Lydia Dixon, Rebecca Schild, and Katie Clifford, all doctoral students in Environmental Studies and Geography.  The Crow research group studies local environmental policy processes and the role that information plays in those processes, with a geographic emphasis on the American West.  In addition to the wildfire-related research presented here, members of the Crow group are actively studying water governance, climate change, oil and gas extraction, wolf restoration, and environmental citizenship.  Crow is affiliated with the Center for Science & Technology Policy Research at C.U., and is also the Associate Director of the Center for Environmental Journalism. 

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2014-09-29
 
Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 11 - Near Term Climate Change by Marika Holland

Reading the IPCC Report: Ch. 11 - Near Term Climate Change by Marika Holland

Ever wonder what the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) report says? This fall's focus is on Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis (Working Group I's contribution to the IPCC 5th Assessment Report)

This is a CIRES-ATOC Seminar Series

For more information please visit: http://cires.colorado.edu/news-events/announcements/new-seminar-series-cires-and-atoc-reading-ipcc-report/

location

CIRES Auditorium - 1665 Central Campus Mall, Boulder, CO 80309
2014-09-30