Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences



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CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Samuel Tang

CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Samuel Tang

Reporting, Regulation, and the Governance of Climate Change in the U.K.

by Samuel Tang, Department of Geography, King's College London

Biography: Samuel Tang studied BSc Geography at the University of Exeter (UK) and was awarded a first class with honours. Following his first degree he continued his studies at the University of Exeter (UK) where he graduated with an MSc in Sustainable Development. In September 2011, Samuel joined the Department of Geography at King's College London after being awarded an ESRC studentship by the King's Interdisciplinary Social Science Doctoral Training Centre (KISS-DTC).

Samuel is also an an affiliated PhD student to Project ICAD at the University of Leeds. The project aims to significantly advance knowledge systems to enable society to adapt effectively to an uncertain climate. The programme is divided into two domains: a) Understanding climate information needs across society and; b) The social status of techno-scientific knowledge in adaptation to climate change.

His research interests include: institutional governance of climate change; the science-policy interface, its interactions and implications for mitigating and adapting to climate change; how science is communicated in society, between stakeholders from multiple-spheres; and the public perception of risk and climate change.

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2014-04-02
 
NSTA: Teaching Climate and Energy - The CLEAN Collection of Peer-reviewed Climate and Energy Learning Resources

NSTA: Teaching Climate and Energy - The CLEAN Collection of Peer-reviewed Climate and Energy Learning Resources

Tamara Ledley, with CLEAN partner TERC will present on using CLEAN in your work.

CLEAN stands for Climate Literacy and Energy Awareness Network. The CLEAN collection of climate and energy learning resources helps you teach with confidence. See materials, teaching tips, and standard alignments at cleanet.org. Find out more!

Presenter(s): Tamara S. Ledley (TERC: Cambridge, MA); Susan M. Buhr (University of Colorado: Boulder, CO); Anne U. Gold (University of Colorado: Boulder, CO); Marian Grogan (TERC: Cambridge, MA)

FORMAT: Presentation

SUBJECT: Earth Science

GRADE LEVEL: Informal Education

location

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, 256
2014-04-03
 
NSTA - Where to Start in Teaching Climate Science: The CLEAN Collection of Resources

NSTA - Where to Start in Teaching Climate Science: The CLEAN Collection of Resources

Deb Morrison with the University of Colorado Boulder School of Education, and former ICEE online course co-instructor will present on using the CLEAN Collection in your classroom.

The CLEAN collection of climate science with lesson, video, and other educational resources was developed to provide free easy-to-access resources for teachers.

Presenter(s): Deb Morrison (University of Colorado: Boulder, CO)

FORMAT: Workshop

SUBJECT: Environmental Science

GRADE LEVEL: General

location

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, 157C
2014-04-03
 
Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Pamela Matson

Distinguished Lecture Series: Dr. Pamela Matson

A new form of global change science:  Science for a Sustainability Transition

Watch the webcast

School of Earth Sciences
Stanford University

matson.jpgAbout the Lecturer
I study the cycling of carbon, nitrogen, and other elements between soil, water, and atmosphere, focusing primarily on the effects of land use and climate change in tropical forest and agricultural systems. Together with hydrologists, atmospheric scientists, economists and agronomists, my students and I analyze the economic drivers and environmental consequences of land use and resource use decisions, with the objective of identifying practices that are economically and environmentally sustainable. We also evaluate management strategies that reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and develop indicators of vulnerability to global climate change.

I teach courses and lecture for graduate and undergraduate students on global environmental change and sustainable agriculture. I also co-teach a field course on interdisciplinary methods for the study of ecosystem processes.

More Information
https://pangea.stanford.edu/departments/eess/people/type/pamela-matson

location

CIRES Auditorium - Boulder, CO

Event Type

DLS
2014-04-04
 
NSTA - Merging Labs and Literature: Exciting Science Lessons Linked to Great Books

NSTA - Merging Labs and Literature: Exciting Science Lessons Linked to Great Books

Discover great resources that link science concepts with engaging fiction and nonfiction young adult literature. Lesson handouts available as well as online resources.

Presenter(s): Emily Kellagher (University of Colorado at Boulder: Boulder, CO); Susan M. Buhr (University of Colorado: Boulder, CO)

FORMAT: Presentation

SUBJECT: General Science

GRADE LEVEL: Elementary-Middle Level

CONFERENCE STRAND: Science and Literacy: A Symbiotic Relationship

location

Boston Convention & Exhibition Center, 258C
2014-04-04
 
 
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CMC Minutes Apr. 14, 2014

CMC Minutes Apr. 14, 2014

CMC Meeting  04/14/2013

 

Members present: Doug Fowler, Joe Olson, Gloria Hicks, Robin Strelow, Anne Perring, Rick Tisinai, Barry Eakins, Kiki Holl, Chris Clack, Ben Livneh , Lucia Harrop

Visitors:  Anju Shaw, Linda Pendergrass, Lornay Hansen, Paula Robinson,

 

Admin – rec’d email from Jon Rush requesting that we make Lucia a CMC member.  Her position will be a permanent (not 3-yr term). Lornay thinks we should have permanent position also from main campus.  We would need to change the by-laws to accommodate permanent positions. Barry thinks it’s a good idea (having permanent positions), but we need to investigate it more. Maybe get a committee to investigate it. Lucia voted in as member, but not yet permanent.  David Oonk took group photo of members for web site.

Doug wants to discuss with the new “Jon Rush” to discuss CIRES telecommuting policy.

Supervisory committee – Doug and Barry meeting with Waleed tomorrow. We need to get some input from Waleed also about the PI issue.

Hiring policy in CIRES – are there ways to make it easier to move people between groups/divisions when a group/division has to let people go? Kristin [?}might be able to help Anju find a position within CIRES. Barry- if there was a central way to coordinate this, it would be very helpful.

Rendezvous – Assigning tasks. Linda provided a list of tasks for us to pick. Rick & Linda will be the go-to people. Posters will be go up Thursday p.m. and Friday a.m. Will do posters in two places – under the tent & UMC 235. There will be food & bar in 235 and on terrace.

We voted to nix the table tents.  We should have signs by laptops to encourage people to use them to search for abstracts.

Barry brought up the “year behind” for promotions and years of service.  Paula says issue has been discussed but no solution.  Lornay- due to the University & CIRES lengthy process, we can’t have the current promotions & years of service.  Maybe we could move Rendezvous? Fall?  Lornay can ask Waleed his restrictions as to when to hold Rendezvous.  Because we’ve done it this way in the past, we don’t have to continue in the same vein. 

Program is progressing well.

Menu – Moroccan – do we serve desserts at lunch or at poster session? Vote – after.

Membership we need end dates for membership.  Two successive terms only (total of 6 consecutive years).  By laws also don’t have any official start.  

date

Monday, April 14, 2014
12:00pm
2014-04-14
 
Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Charles J. Weschler

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Charles J. Weschler

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Chemical Reactions Among Pollutants Indoors – The Human Touch

Charles J. Weschler, Rutgers University

Regardless of whether a pollutant originates outdoors or indoors, most of our exposure to it occurs indoors. Indoor exposures to ozone and airborne particles of outdoor origin partially explain the mortality ascribed to these pollutants in epidemiological studies. The human body influences indoor concentrations of these and other chemicals in occupied indoor environments. Constituents of human skin oil react with ozone. Lower indoor ozone concentrations lead to less generation of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) from ozone-initiated reactions with terpenes and other unsaturated indoor pollutants. SOA levels influence the levels of co-occurring semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs). Occupants also inadvertently transfer their skin oils and skin flakes to surfaces, impacting indoor surface chemistry, even when humans are no longer present. In brief, dynamic physical and chemical processes involving occupants and indoor pollutants markedly influence occupant exposures in indoor environments.

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274 1665 Central Campus Mall - CIRES - University of Colorado
2014-04-14
 
 
CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Visualising the Environment and the Politics of Representation

CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Visualising the Environment and the Politics of Representation

 

cstpr_spring2014.jpgSpring 2014 Series 
12:00 - 1:00 PM


Visualising the Environment and the Politics of RepresentationApril 16, 2014

by Joanna Boehnert, Center for Science & Technology Policy Research, University of Colorado 

Institute of Behaviroal Sciences, 155 B

Free and open to the public

Watch the webcast live

Wednesday, 16 April, 2014
12:00 PM - 01:00 PM

location

Institute of Behavioral Sciences, Room 155B - University of Colorado
2014-04-16
 
 
An Evening of Conversation and Music with 'Climate Communicator'

An Evening of Conversation and Music with 'Climate Communicator'

An Evening of Conversation and Music with 'Climate Communicator' Andrew Revkin

revkin2.jpgAn Evening of Conversationand Music with
'climate communicator' Andrew Revkin

Friday, April 18 at 7:30 PM
Macky Auditorium, University of Colorado Boulder
Free and Open to the Public

Join us for an interview with noted environmental writer, Andrew Revkin. Afterwards enjoy a live performance of Revkin's original music that he will perform from his recently released album. His final piece, Liberating Carbon, will be accompanied by a live shadow play performance. A perfect evening out for all ages.

Andrew Revkin is the Senior Fellow for Environmental Understanding at Pace University and has been writing about environmental sustainability for more than three decades, from the Amazon to the White House to the North Pole, mainly for The New York Times. He has won the top awards in science journalism multiple times, along with a Guggenheim Fellowship. At Pace, he teaches courses in blogging, environmental communication and documentary film. He has written acclaimed books on global warming, the changing Arctic and the assault on the Amazon rain forest, as well as three book chapters on science communication. Drawing on his experience with his Times blog, Dot Earth, which Time Magazine named one of the top 25 blogs in 2013, Revkin speaks to audiences around the world about the power of the Web to foster progress. He's also a performing songwriter, was a longtime accompanist for Pete Seeger and recently released his first album of original songs, which was hailed as a 'tasty mix of roots goulash' on Jambands, an influential music website. Two films have been based on his work: 'Rock Star' (Warner Brothers, 2001) and 'The Burning Season' (HBO, 1994).

This event is brought to the Boulder community by
Inside the Greenhouse
Center for Science & Technology Policy Research
Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences
CU Global Development Coalition
Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research
CU Performers Without Borders
International Collective on Environment, Culture & Politics

location

Macky Auditorium - University of Colorado
2014-04-18
 
 
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CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Katie Dickinson

CSTPR Noontime Seminar: Katie Dickinson

Playing with Fire: Social Interactions and Wildfire Mitigation Behaviors in Colorado

by Katie Dickinson, Climate Science & Applications Program, National Center for Atmospheric Research, and Center for Science and Technology Policy Research, University of Colorado

Biography: Katie Dickinson is an environmental economist who studies how humans behave in the face of environmental risks.  Her research topics have included sanitation behaviors in India, malaria-related decisionmaking in Tanzania, willingness to pay for mosquito control in Wisconsin and Florida, and homeowners' wildfire mitigation choices in Colorado.  Across these diverse topics, Katie has examined how people perceive different environmental risks and what costs and benefits people consider in deciding how to respond to those risks.  She is particularly interested in how neighbors and social contacts influence a person's own choices.  Katie is excited about the prospect of working more closely with natural and physical scientists on projects that build an integrated understanding of the ways that human actions and environmental processes interact.  A newly funded project on clean cookstoves and their air quality and health impacts in Ghana is a prime example of this kind of interdisciplinary research.

Katie received Bachelor and Master of Science degrees from Stanford University, and a Ph.D. from Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment.  She was a Robert Wood Johnson Health and Society Scholar at the University of Wisconsin before joining NCAR in 2010 as a Postdoctoral Fellow with support from the Advanced Study Program and the Integrated Sciences Program.

location

CSTPR Conference Room, 1333 Grandview Avenue

resources

Event Type

CSTPR
2014-04-23
 
Science/Arts Experiment

Science/Arts Experiment

Feelings and facts, emotion and intellect. How do we really receive what we see and hear?

For nearly a year, scientists* and filmaker/visual artist Jeanne Liotta and composer/new media artist Michael Theodore have been meeting in an informal think tank to explore the intersection of science and the arts – and how that intersection might be displayed on Science On a Sphere® (SOS).

SOS is a global display system that uses video projectors to display Earth Science and other images on a six foot diameter sphere. SOS is installed in more than 100 science and other facilities worldwide with an annual audience of 33 million.

Join us on April 24th at Fiske Planetarium to explore which ways are most effective for engaging and inspiring us. Members of the audience will be invited to view selected SOS presentations that have been developed. A reception will be provided.

Download the flyer


The Reception and Experiment are FREE and open to the public. 
* There is only room for 100 people to attend, and it is first come first served.

The Colorado Skies program is an exciting presentation open to all that takes you on a journey through the Colorado night sky in Fiske's new ultra high-definition planetarium. Please click here for more information about the presentation and ticketing.


Map/Transit

Map to Fiske and Parking Information

Bus: The closest bus stop to Fiske Planetairum is at 'Broadway and Regent Drive' (the SKIP and DASH buses both stop here). Click here for a walking map.

Contact

If you have any questions, please contact:
Shilpi.Gupta@noaa.gov (NOAA Science On a Sphere®)
info.ecoarts@gmail.com (EcoArts Connections)


Acknowledgment

*Special thanks to the following scientists and outreach specialists in the project's advisory group: Max Boykoff, Susan Buhr, Susan Lynds, Julienne Stroeve, Pieter Tans, Betsy Weatherhead, Carol Wessman

This project was made possible through a collaboration of NOAA Science On a Sphere® and EcoArts Connections with funding from the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) Innovative Research Program in Boulder, Colorado.

location

Fiske Planetarium - 2414 Regent Drive
2014-04-24
 
 
 
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Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Samantha Thompson

Analytical Chemistry Seminar: Samantha Thompson

Jointly sponsored by the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CIRES, and the Environmental Program

Gas/Particle Partitioning of Organic Acids:  Instrument development and field deployment

Samantha Thompson

Organic acids are common atmospheric oxidation products and can help our understanding of those mechanisms. In particular their partitioning between the gas and particle phase can lead to a better understanding of their contribution to SOA loadings and lifetime. In this talk I will be presenting the development a new instrument (the FIGAERO-HRToF-CIMS) for real time detection of both gas and particle phase organic acids.  Results from lab characterization and a field campaign as part of the Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) will be shown.

location

CIRES Fellows Room, Ekeley S274 - 1665 Central Campus Mall
2014-04-28
 
Resolved: College Athletes Should Be Allowed to Unionize

Resolved: College Athletes Should Be Allowed to Unionize

DEBATE ON COLLEGE ATHLETICS

Resolved: College Athletes Should Be Allowed to Unionize

Tuesday, April 29 at 9:00 - 11:00 AM
Auditorium, Dal Ward Athletic Center
Free and open to the community
View Flyer | More Info

In March, 2014 the National Labor Relations Board ruled that football players at Northwestern University would be allowed to unionize in order to secure labor rights as university athletes. Northwestern University immediately appealed the decision. Kain Colter, the Northwestern Quaterback, explained: 'Right now the NCAA is like a dictatorship. No one represents us in negotiations. The only way things are going to change is if players have a union.' The NCAA opposed the move: 'This union-backed attempt to turn student-athletes into employees undermines the purpose of college: an education. Student-athletes are not employees, and their participation in college sports is voluntary.' Who is right?

As part of their final project, students in ETHN 3104, The Governance of Sport, are organizing an Oxford-style debate on the subject of unionization among college athletes. Half the class will be taking the affirmative position and the other half the negative. Audience participation will be part of the debate, which is open to the University community.

This debate is for educational purposes only. No position is being taken or is affiliated by the University of Colorado.

This event is brought to the Boulder community by
STePPS program at the CIRES Center for Science and Technology Policy Research
Leadership Program of the Department of Athletics

location

Dal Ward Athletic Center, Auditorium, University of Colorado
2014-04-29